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The blog.


Hiring Quality Talent

Believe it or not, identifying a quality hire goes beyond a stacked resume or great recommendations. In fact, there are actually measurable calculations associated with quality hires based off of the goals of the company filling the position.

Quality hires can be attributed to the use of performance-based objectives established during the hiring process. Rather than identifying surface level qualities that must be met in the recruitment stage, such as education level or experience, direct objectives for identified success should be highlighted with goals and expectations being the prime focus.

Rather than a bulleted list of duties, make the job compelling to begin the employee “buy-in” process. Turn the description into an impactful story allowing for any potential candidate to begin to see the impact they can make. This will help garner strong candidates, fully interested in what the position has to offer and how they can be of service.

Focus on the past rather than the present. If a new hire is able to equate their past experiences with one comparable to those listed in the performance-based job description, they will have increased motivation to continue that trend of success as they already possess the skills and accomplishments to do so.

It is important to evaluate the quality of the candidate, pre-hire and post-hire. Before the candidate is offered the position, focus on past accomplishments and understand how they can support overall goals and objectives. This same process should be used post-hire as well. Once the candidate is on the job, circle back to the interview process and the agreements that were reached and experiences that were mentioned – this will help categorize employees as quality hires or can pinpoint weaknesses that need to be addressed.

How Giving Back Influences The Bottom Line

The holiday spirit is in the air, with businesses focusing on how they can give back to the community. While acts of gratitude positively affect personal health and happiness, there is also a strong correlation between charitable giving and boosting the bottom line.

By focusing on an impactful community cause, companies are able to connect on a deeper level with customers, partners and employees who share the same values to make a difference, opening the door for new and meaningful business ventures to arise beyond just the holiday season.

Beyond the public relations advantage that the spirit of giving provides, tax advantages also affect the bottom line. With a certain amount donated, organizations are able to claim a charitable deduction offering businesses the opportunity to give back with money not being a major deterrent to do so.

Taking a few moments out of the work day to volunteer at a local food bank or donate time to deliver presents to less fortunate children increases company visibility within the community and provides employees a unique insight into the culture that the organization was built on.

Giving of time and financial support to those in need is a simple and easy reminder to be grateful. When given the chance, employees develop a sense of accomplishment for their service and appreciation for the position they are in and the company providing the opportunity. Morale increases and the desire to work hard for a company that believes in helping those in need grows a bit stronger.

The Advantages of Job Shadowing

Having the opportunity to shadow senior leadership when beginning a career or transitioning to a new position provides countless benefits, specifically, the resources and skillsets that are available in a shortened timeframe. But, why choose shadowing versus another on-boarding system when welcoming a new employee?

Shadowing is most important when the position is best learned through seeing or doing. The new hire is able to take in a plethora of information that, if trained through a different method, might be overlooked or not mentioned. It provides a “hands-on” approach to a position that may require a “hands-on” mindset.

The ability to learn firsthand from leaders who have forged their own path to success is second to none. The time spent with senior employees opens to the door to understand the ins and outs of the company culture, fine-tune and continue to develop professionally, and gain expert insights into the business. Shadowing also expedites the on-boarding process as new hires begin to acquaint themselves with the business sooner.

Job shadowing provides a behind-the-curtain look at the expectations of job duties, key deliverables needed, and the interactions between coworkers and peers and coworkers and senior management. This provides an excellent chance for senior management to recognize if processes, job descriptions or culture needs to be restructured or reevaluated.

New Year, New Focus

With the new year right around the corner most people are focused on personal improvement, new goals or beginning new habits. But this year could be the year for you to take the time to make positive resolutions to refocus on career advancement.

In 2018, invest energy into choosing realistic goals that require going outside of your comfort zone and pushing the limits. Acquire a new skill that may fill a gap for lateral movement and seek to improve upon areas that need more attention. Putting yourself in the best possible position to achieve, puts you in control of the outcome.

Implement helpful tricks to organize your life, workspace and mindset. Start each day of the new year with a fresh mind by clearing out the clutter that life can sometimes bring and figuring out a way to keep yourself efficient and productive. Prioritize small moments of organization, whether it be through keeping a steady workout regime to clear your mind or ensuring that your desk is tidy at the end of the day.

Find balance. Health and happiness go hand-in-hand with achievement and hard work. When you believe in the work that you do and wake up enjoying the life you live, success will follow.

Employee Company Reviews – how important are they?

Employee reviews can reveal a lot about an organization. Do you know what your employee reviews say about your company?

Sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed provide direct employee feedback about companies which can either make or break the recruitment process. Scouting for talent, in most cases, has a direct connection to how a company is perceived by its employees. So, how can organizations stay on top of these reviews and use them to their advantage?

Turn the critical reviews into opportunity! It is best to dedicate the needed time to monitor your online brand and use this feedback to make a difference in the company’s culture. Knowing the honest, and sometimes, painful truth about how employees discern their time within the business can help strengthen the structure of the workplace.

The idea of transparency should not be something to shy away from either. Knowing the ins and outs of a certain position or department and the impression it holds both internally and externally, will give managers the ability to identify weaknesses, be pragmatic and fill in the gaps recognized by employees.

The Impact of a New Position

Creating a new position is, in most cases, associated with filling a need for a specific role that is lacking within the company’s current business model. What is often overlooked is the impact it has on employee morale and overall view of the business opportunities.

Whether it be an entry-level or C-suite position, the addition of an employee’s career progression heightens the outlook of the company as it shows strength, sustainability, and regard for growth in its employees. Investing in the company’s support system not only positively correlates with business success but, contributes to maintaining a stable and continued future.

By creating a new position, the culture of current employees shifts to recognize and appreciate the support their existing position will be backed by. This can allow for duties to be redistributed and focus to be reprioritized to maintain continuity and support of overall values for the organization.

On the other hand, the creation of an executive position highlights the ideals of continuous employee growth. With a new executive-level added, companies are able to show their investment in the employees, emphasizing a culture of sustainability. Not only will lower-level employees aim to advance towards new levels but, current top executives will be motivated to continue to learn and grow within the organization.

While adding a new position may fill a void in the company’s overall business structure, the impact that a new position holds for current and incoming employees is far greater than what meets the eye.

Job vs. Money: What do you choose?

Happiness is characterized in different ways by different people. One person may believe that job satisfaction will lead to ultimate happiness while another, believes that a substantial paycheck will do the trick. So, when the time comes to choose a career based on money or the job, what should the choice be?

It has been found that the “magic number”, which correlates happiness with salary, is $75,000. That is, once a person has reached the $75,000 pay grade threshold, their overall happiness does not have a direct response to anything above that. Adversely, being below that “magic number” causes the opposite reaction and exposes emotional pain points that may affect everyday life. While a high income may not sustain boundless happiness, there is a certain point of happiness that parallels a steady income.

The magic number identifies monetary happiness, however, taking into consideration the enjoyment in the work that is done day in and day out is also a major factor of happiness. The interest to advance and make an impact on the company and an individual’s life comes with having satisfaction in what a position entails. Understanding personal goals and objectives and aligning them with the company’s, opens the door to advancement and longevity, ultimately translating into financial success.

The driver of success and happiness – personally, professionally, financially – stems from the effort to directly shape our own lives. The human ability to find happiness and be successful in every aspect derives from creating an enjoyable life, which can’t be found by chasing a paycheck. While a high income may bring immediate satisfaction, the feeling will eventually fade and no tangible feeling of accomplishment will be had. Take the time to establish a prosperous life because the benefits of the work put in will follow.

Attracting Out-Of-Town Talent

Skills, compatibility, and drive – these are a just a few characteristics companies seek in potential new hires; however, there could be other various factors which makes a candidate more favorable. For instance, geographic location plays a large role in determining the difference between a suitable candidate and the perfect candidate.

The key to successfully broadening the hiring search pool is to understand the work style and abilities of the prospective hire and communicating how the company is invested in their future.

In order to attract job-seekers from in and around the company’s geographic location, focus on the industry and economic environment of the company that the employee may relocate to. Does this transition provide the best path for success and growth?

Rather than looking at the qualifications of a job, it is important to understand how, outside of the corporate structure, this candidate can find success and be happy about the decision to move. Highlight the location of the company by sharing favorite parts of the city and why many have chosen to build a career there.

Continue to stay true to the company’s roots. Make the culture of the workplace a central part of the discussion. Focus on the people, values, and opportunity the company has found success with as those qualities are what will continue the cycle of achievement.

Considerations for the Future

Making a career change can be difficult for anyone. However, the dependence of a transition for an executive weighs on the prospective employer and their future with the company.

Personal growth remains to be the most significant factor an executive considers when considering a career change. With an emphasis placed on continual learning, most executives search for opportunities that allow them to expand their skill set rather than chasing a title advancement.

And like any other searching candidate, executives also rely on the opportunities that the potential company offers. When given a chance to stretch their skills and abilities to new levels, allowing for them to see a significant change, executives are far more willing to shift to that new role than stay complacent in what they know.

Environmental factors come into account during the decision process, too. Is a shift in career going to make a positive impact on work-based culture? Will a transition allow for greater responsibility and oversight of a larger team? How will this position fall into the entirety of the organizational success? These questions all play a factor in an executive deciding whether to make a move or not. This element is mostly dependent on the overall goals of the executive candidate and the current state of their ongoing position.

While direct compensation does not play a significant role in an executive move, the financial stability of the organization does. If the prospective company shows greater return and less risk in company sales, work hours, employee turnover, mergers and acquisitions and competitive advantage compared to their current position, a top-level executive will realize those benefits and make the move into a new career.

 

 

What to do when a candidate goes dark

As a recruiter, one of the most important aspects of the job is keeping candidates interested in the opportunity. Every so often, a candidate goes dark – all communication stops out of the blue and when this happens, it feels as if all progress that has been made has been lost.

What can be done on the recruitment end to alleviate the stress that comes when a candidate goes cold?

Emphasize the importance of communication and set deadlines for response time. It is important to begin the relationship through various methods of communication; if the candidate does go dark, a call to “check up” is routine rather than desperate. While establishing the relationship, understand how active the candidate is in their search and their timeline to transition into a new opportunity.

Gain their respect and trust. Guide the candidate as an advisor in their search, helping steer them in a direction you believe to be the best move for their future. A candidate is far less inclined to go dark if they trust who they are talking to and have faith in the system.

Should you execute these tips, but to no avail, run into a candidate where all communication has stopped, you must then evaluate if the candidate is worth the time. Should you change gears and move on to a candidate that would be more than eager to be given the opportunity? You may begin to spend more time trying to connect with a lost connection rather than building a relationship with a zealous one.