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The blog.


Employee Company Reviews – how important are they?

Employee reviews can reveal a lot about an organization. Do you know what your employee reviews say about your company?

Sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed provide direct employee feedback about companies which can either make or break the recruitment process. Scouting for talent, in most cases, has a direct connection to how a company is perceived by its employees. So, how can organizations stay on top of these reviews and use them to their advantage?

Turn the critical reviews into opportunity! It is best to dedicate the needed time to monitor your online brand and use this feedback to make a difference in the company’s culture. Knowing the honest, and sometimes, painful truth about how employees discern their time within the business can help strengthen the structure of the workplace.

The idea of transparency should not be something to shy away from either. Knowing the ins and outs of a certain position or department and the impression it holds both internally and externally, will give managers the ability to identify weaknesses, be pragmatic and fill in the gaps recognized by employees.

The Impact of a New Position

Creating a new position is, in most cases, associated with filling a need for a specific role that is lacking within the company’s current business model. What is often overlooked is the impact it has on employee morale and overall view of the business opportunities.

Whether it be an entry-level or C-suite position, the addition of an employee’s career progression heightens the outlook of the company as it shows strength, sustainability, and regard for growth in its employees. Investing in the company’s support system not only positively correlates with business success but, contributes to maintaining a stable and continued future.

By creating a new position, the culture of current employees shifts to recognize and appreciate the support their existing position will be backed by. This can allow for duties to be redistributed and focus to be reprioritized to maintain continuity and support of overall values for the organization.

On the other hand, the creation of an executive position highlights the ideals of continuous employee growth. With a new executive-level added, companies are able to show their investment in the employees, emphasizing a culture of sustainability. Not only will lower-level employees aim to advance towards new levels but, current top executives will be motivated to continue to learn and grow within the organization.

While adding a new position may fill a void in the company’s overall business structure, the impact that a new position holds for current and incoming employees is far greater than what meets the eye.

Job vs. Money: What do you choose?

Happiness is characterized in different ways by different people. One person may believe that job satisfaction will lead to ultimate happiness while another, believes that a substantial paycheck will do the trick. So, when the time comes to choose a career based on money or the job, what should the choice be?

It has been found that the “magic number”, which correlates happiness with salary, is $75,000. That is, once a person has reached the $75,000 pay grade threshold, their overall happiness does not have a direct response to anything above that. Adversely, being below that “magic number” causes the opposite reaction and exposes emotional pain points that may affect everyday life. While a high income may not sustain boundless happiness, there is a certain point of happiness that parallels a steady income.

The magic number identifies monetary happiness, however, taking into consideration the enjoyment in the work that is done day in and day out is also a major factor of happiness. The interest to advance and make an impact on the company and an individual’s life comes with having satisfaction in what a position entails. Understanding personal goals and objectives and aligning them with the company’s, opens the door to advancement and longevity, ultimately translating into financial success.

The driver of success and happiness – personally, professionally, financially – stems from the effort to directly shape our own lives. The human ability to find happiness and be successful in every aspect derives from creating an enjoyable life, which can’t be found by chasing a paycheck. While a high income may bring immediate satisfaction, the feeling will eventually fade and no tangible feeling of accomplishment will be had. Take the time to establish a prosperous life because the benefits of the work put in will follow.

Attracting Out-Of-Town Talent

Skills, compatibility, and drive – these are a just a few characteristics companies seek in potential new hires; however, there could be other various factors which makes a candidate more favorable. For instance, geographic location plays a large role in determining the difference between a suitable candidate and the perfect candidate.

The key to successfully broadening the hiring search pool is to understand the work style and abilities of the prospective hire and communicating how the company is invested in their future.

In order to attract job-seekers from in and around the company’s geographic location, focus on the industry and economic environment of the company that the employee may relocate to. Does this transition provide the best path for success and growth?

Rather than looking at the qualifications of a job, it is important to understand how, outside of the corporate structure, this candidate can find success and be happy about the decision to move. Highlight the location of the company by sharing favorite parts of the city and why many have chosen to build a career there.

Continue to stay true to the company’s roots. Make the culture of the workplace a central part of the discussion. Focus on the people, values, and opportunity the company has found success with as those qualities are what will continue the cycle of achievement.

Considerations for the Future

Making a career change can be difficult for anyone. However, the dependence of a transition for an executive weighs on the prospective employer and their future with the company.

Personal growth remains to be the most significant factor an executive considers when considering a career change. With an emphasis placed on continual learning, most executives search for opportunities that allow them to expand their skill set rather than chasing a title advancement.

And like any other searching candidate, executives also rely on the opportunities that the potential company offers. When given a chance to stretch their skills and abilities to new levels, allowing for them to see a significant change, executives are far more willing to shift to that new role than stay complacent in what they know.

Environmental factors come into account during the decision process, too. Is a shift in career going to make a positive impact on work-based culture? Will a transition allow for greater responsibility and oversight of a larger team? How will this position fall into the entirety of the organizational success? These questions all play a factor in an executive deciding whether to make a move or not. This element is mostly dependent on the overall goals of the executive candidate and the current state of their ongoing position.

While direct compensation does not play a significant role in an executive move, the financial stability of the organization does. If the prospective company shows greater return and less risk in company sales, work hours, employee turnover, mergers and acquisitions and competitive advantage compared to their current position, a top-level executive will realize those benefits and make the move into a new career.

 

 

What to do when a candidate goes dark

As a recruiter, one of the most important aspects of the job is keeping candidates interested in the opportunity. Every so often, a candidate goes dark – all communication stops out of the blue and when this happens, it feels as if all progress that has been made has been lost.

What can be done on the recruitment end to alleviate the stress that comes when a candidate goes cold?

Emphasize the importance of communication and set deadlines for response time. It is important to begin the relationship through various methods of communication; if the candidate does go dark, a call to “check up” is routine rather than desperate. While establishing the relationship, understand how active the candidate is in their search and their timeline to transition into a new opportunity.

Gain their respect and trust. Guide the candidate as an advisor in their search, helping steer them in a direction you believe to be the best move for their future. A candidate is far less inclined to go dark if they trust who they are talking to and have faith in the system.

Should you execute these tips, but to no avail, run into a candidate where all communication has stopped, you must then evaluate if the candidate is worth the time. Should you change gears and move on to a candidate that would be more than eager to be given the opportunity? You may begin to spend more time trying to connect with a lost connection rather than building a relationship with a zealous one.

Never Under Estimate Your Value!

Confidence within the workplace is key to a successful career, and a portion of such confidence is the power that comes with knowing ones true value. Social interactions, energy and attitude play a major part in how people interact with one another in the workplace. Positive interactions are driven by value-led thoughts.

Believing that you have what it takes to make a powerful impact in your role and not accepting less than what is deserved solidifies the understanding of your self-worth. Have the confidence to say what you want because you know it is earned but also, have the humility to realize unrealistic expectations.

Evaluate who you are and who you want to be, while celebrating your accomplishments. Prioritizing your commitments and personally valuing who you are will translate into value in any situation.

Growing Leaders

If you ask people around you to define leadership, chances are there will be a large variety of answers. Words like coach, power and respect are often riddles in the responses but the same general tone to describe leadership is someone with influence.

Oftentimes though, people mistake leaders for some in high ranking positions when leaders can be found even in the most entry-level positions. The key is fostering those early leadership skills to support a possible rise in position status within the company.

The most fundamental foundation to any strong leader is trust. When times get tough, it is important that employees have trust in their leader to be the calm in the storm. Establishing an environment that allows for vulnerability fosters the ability for employees to think independently with the notion that failure is okay and encourages bridging the gap between the executives and the team they manage.

Communication goes hand-in-hand with trust. Employees need to trust that they can communicate with their leader. Setting forth a pragmatic point of view will challenge employees to think about how they can improve on mistakes made and enable them to creatively work to find solutions in the future. Disclosing noncritical company information, both successes and failures, provides employees with a sense of belonging as they begin to understand their role through both a micro and macro view of the company.

Transitioning to the C-Suite

The ascension to the C-Suite is often paired with redesigned goals and ideas to ensure success in the new role. Fostering a successful transition can bring challenges as aligning others around those specific objectives is not always an easy feat.

To combat these common struggles, it is best to establish a shared vision on company priorities. Aligning the organization to understand and believe in the strategic design of the organization is a critical component to build success when executives are promoted or have accepted  a senior role. By creating an environment where employees buy-in to the vision of the company, executives will work to establish an immediate and long-term impact in the foundation of the organization.

Accepting that the answers are not always clear, and can be a significant learning curve during any transition. Making quick and calculated moves to establish a trustworthy team allows for any executive to begin to influence others with designed support.

Taking all of this into account, nothing can be done without the thought and preparation of self-readiness. By designating the appropriate amount of time to a purposeful tenure, ascending into the C-Suite will be complimented with proven results.

Turning Over a New Leaf on Employee Turnover

The connotations associated with “employee turnover” are often negative. From lost costs to disruption in an organization, employee turnover does have significant risks that test the strength of a company and its structure.

What is often overlooked is the benefit that employee turnover may bring to the organization.

Zappos, an online shoe and clothing store, has been widely praised for its mindset surrounding employee satisfaction. In 2015, the company began offering its employees exit payments, an incentive given to those who were interested in the company but decided it was not a right fit for them. This incentive lead to approximately 14% of employees accepting the offer.

While some turnover is encouraged, the importance of organizational agility is two-fold. The ability for employees to manage their employment satisfaction translates into greater success, for those who stay with the company have a mindset committed to the company’s growth and future.  Wiith the possibility of sporadic, unplanned position vacancies, positioning the business model to react and absorb any negative repercussions takes time, commitment and understanding.

It is crucial to create a culture that recognizes employee turnover is not always negative but rather something that can offer a positive shift in skills, mindsets, and motivations for the workforce, ultimately lending to the success of an agile and proactive company.