Tag: Benefits


What’s more important – the degree or the experience?

With degrees becoming more and more common, the experience that a candidate brings to the position has taken the front seat in the hiring process. Needless to say, a degree does offer valuable skill important to a candidate’s resume.

The significance of completing a degree speaks to the candidate’s ability to be successful in various life and job-related aspects such as multi-tasking, social interactions, and ethical dilemmas. While the degree title and focus furthers the intellectual aspect of a candidate, it does not necessarily correlate to how much success a person will have within their position.

Experience is considerably the most valuable aspect a candidate can possess. The real-world experience that is transferable to the position in mind, provides far deeper insight as to how the employee will perform in a certain situation rather than the assumption of taught skills in the classroom.

However, a degree should not be any less valuable. Many entry qualifications for open positions specifically highlight the need of a degree to advance. Where the experience begins to overshadow a degree is through the interview process and the ability of a candidate to equate actual experiential moments to the demands of the job.

While the accomplishment of completing the route of higher education is still highly regarded in job recruiting, having first-hand knowledge of the qualifications that are to be expected has started to become the frontrunner when choosing between candidates with virtually similar resumes.

The Advantages of Job Shadowing

Having the opportunity to shadow senior leadership when beginning a career or transitioning to a new position provides countless benefits, specifically, the resources and skillsets that are available in a shortened timeframe. But, why choose shadowing versus another on-boarding system when welcoming a new employee?

Shadowing is most important when the position is best learned through seeing or doing. The new hire is able to take in a plethora of information that, if trained through a different method, might be overlooked or not mentioned. It provides a “hands-on” approach to a position that may require a “hands-on” mindset.

The ability to learn firsthand from leaders who have forged their own path to success is second to none. The time spent with senior employees opens to the door to understand the ins and outs of the company culture, fine-tune and continue to develop professionally, and gain expert insights into the business. Shadowing also expedites the on-boarding process as new hires begin to acquaint themselves with the business sooner.

Job shadowing provides a behind-the-curtain look at the expectations of job duties, key deliverables needed, and the interactions between coworkers and peers and coworkers and senior management. This provides an excellent chance for senior management to recognize if processes, job descriptions or culture needs to be restructured or reevaluated.

The Impact of a New Position

Creating a new position is, in most cases, associated with filling a need for a specific role that is lacking within the company’s current business model. What is often overlooked is the impact it has on employee morale and overall view of the business opportunities.

Whether it be an entry-level or C-suite position, the addition of an employee’s career progression heightens the outlook of the company as it shows strength, sustainability, and regard for growth in its employees. Investing in the company’s support system not only positively correlates with business success but, contributes to maintaining a stable and continued future.

By creating a new position, the culture of current employees shifts to recognize and appreciate the support their existing position will be backed by. This can allow for duties to be redistributed and focus to be reprioritized to maintain continuity and support of overall values for the organization.

On the other hand, the creation of an executive position highlights the ideals of continuous employee growth. With a new executive-level added, companies are able to show their investment in the employees, emphasizing a culture of sustainability. Not only will lower-level employees aim to advance towards new levels but, current top executives will be motivated to continue to learn and grow within the organization.

While adding a new position may fill a void in the company’s overall business structure, the impact that a new position holds for current and incoming employees is far greater than what meets the eye.

Attracting Out-Of-Town Talent

Skills, compatibility, and drive – these are a just a few characteristics companies seek in potential new hires; however, there could be other various factors which makes a candidate more favorable. For instance, geographic location plays a large role in determining the difference between a suitable candidate and the perfect candidate.

The key to successfully broadening the hiring search pool is to understand the work style and abilities of the prospective hire and communicating how the company is invested in their future.

In order to attract job-seekers from in and around the company’s geographic location, focus on the industry and economic environment of the company that the employee may relocate to. Does this transition provide the best path for success and growth?

Rather than looking at the qualifications of a job, it is important to understand how, outside of the corporate structure, this candidate can find success and be happy about the decision to move. Highlight the location of the company by sharing favorite parts of the city and why many have chosen to build a career there.

Continue to stay true to the company’s roots. Make the culture of the workplace a central part of the discussion. Focus on the people, values, and opportunity the company has found success with as those qualities are what will continue the cycle of achievement.

Turning Over a New Leaf on Employee Turnover

The connotations associated with “employee turnover” are often negative. From lost costs to disruption in an organization, employee turnover does have significant risks that test the strength of a company and its structure.

What is often overlooked is the benefit that employee turnover may bring to the organization.

Zappos, an online shoe and clothing store, has been widely praised for its mindset surrounding employee satisfaction. In 2015, the company began offering its employees exit payments, an incentive given to those who were interested in the company but decided it was not a right fit for them. This incentive lead to approximately 14% of employees accepting the offer.

While some turnover is encouraged, the importance of organizational agility is two-fold. The ability for employees to manage their employment satisfaction translates into greater success, for those who stay with the company have a mindset committed to the company’s growth and future.  Wiith the possibility of sporadic, unplanned position vacancies, positioning the business model to react and absorb any negative repercussions takes time, commitment and understanding.

It is crucial to create a culture that recognizes employee turnover is not always negative but rather something that can offer a positive shift in skills, mindsets, and motivations for the workforce, ultimately lending to the success of an agile and proactive company.

Compensation Budgeting

Budgeting is always a hot topic when it comes to employee benefits, which can sometimes lead to recruiters feeling as if their budget is stretched too thin to cover everything that is wanted in the workplace. But, it doesn’t need to be like that – here are some simple tricks to making the most out of a tight budget:

  • Offer competitive non-salary benefits. Make up for a lack of monetary incentives with benefits catered towards the employee’s needs. Offering childcare support, flexible schedules, office space, remote working opportunities and other chances for employees to feel valued is a great alternative that does not require salary-impacted benefits – rather, focus on employee work-life balance.
  • Focus on what’s important. There are items that can be considered “must-haves” that will make a huge difference in the day-to-day work life. Prioritizing items that are “must-haves” versus the “nice-to-haves.” Do this by ensuring the expenses are worth every penny.
  • Forecast – it’s vital to a healthy workplace budget. Keep in mind that staffing will change in the next year whether you see it coming or not. It is important to plan for these changes and leave a bit of budgetary room available to account for those changes, especially considering employee compensation.
  • Understand that you will not always be right. Whatever compensation package is offered, it is never going to be the best thing for every employee, and that is okay. Realize the biggest factors that will lead to company and employee success. One of the best ways to show appreciation for employees is fair compensation, so focus your attention on the benefits that will make the biggest impact for the largest number of employees.