Tag: Company Objectives


Driving the Mission for the Organization

The heart of any company begins with its mission statement. The mission statement is the very definition of what the company stands for and the potential future outlook of the business. Much like a company’s value, it shapes the organizational culture where employees learn and grow. If one member of the team doesn’t believe in the same vision the entire team can begin to crumble.

Executives should be the ultimate advocates of driving the mission statement home. They need to constantly focus on how to better the organization and what steps to take to get closer to the ultimate goal. If they do not believe in the vision of the company, this can create a major disturbance in pushing the entire company forward.

Is it worth the time and energy to dedicate time and resources in coaching the executive to invest themselves more? Or should you turn your attention to someone that can prove to be a driving force towards the future?

Many times, the executive cannot offer 100% buy-in to the company’s mission. While the executive may offer great departmental support to the overall vision, if they are not focused on the same goal this can be a deterrent to the desired success in the long run.

Focusing attention on someone who wants to see organizational growth fall within the mission of the company is important. The executives and employees that support the direction a company is headed are more willing to dedicate the time needed to see the goals come to fruition. Try not spin your wheels on a stalled executive, and instead, cruise into the future with a group of supporters backing you.

Should Succession Planning be on your Company Agenda?

As the structure of an organization matures and employees begin to mature and transition from their initial roles, succession planning becomes a key piece in ensuring the organization will continue to run smoothly.

Be proactive in outlining a succession plan that works best for the culture of the company. Set aside adequate time to identify the key traits needed for another leader to fill the soon-to-be vacant position. Even if a transition is not expected immediately, proper timing and planning make a difference in the midst of any occupational shift.

In the spirit of timing, this offers an excellent opportunity to provide training to other employees that may be interested in leadership roles down the road or perform trail runs for potential candidates whom may be closer to the level of accepting more responsibility. Opening up the chance for employees to actively seek leadership roles and identifying top performers, organizations pave a greater road towards smoother transitions.

Through training and vetting, it is important to relay the shared vision of the organization. Engaging in transparent strategic conversations will not only help develop a greater vision for future success inter-departmentally but it will also magnify the strengths of top-performers.

Once an internal succession structure is identified, the process should be mirrored and appropriately transitioned to fit the hiring strategy, establishing the traits valued in top-leadership parallels that of new additions.

What defines a high-performing organization?

The ability for an organization to perform adequately doesn’t begin with goals and end with results. High performance is paired with strategic organizational structure and goal output.

Company leadership paves the way towards effectiveness. Through strong leaders, comes engaged and passionate employees focused on the organization’s goals and values. Leadership must have the understanding of the importance of acknowledging strengths of employees and building through weaknesses. This cultural design will, in turn, result in employees understanding their role within the company.

Effective organizational processes and procedures also allows for businesses to see high-performing results. From HR practices to marketing tactics, organizations must have established processes to yield wanted results. Granted, not every position allows for a clean step-by-step process. Solidifying a clear path towards company goals will provide employees and management the proper tools to focus on success should a situation arise that may initially detract from that.

The ability to react appropriately to change and complications sets strong organizations apart from the rest. While laying out an ideal plan of action provides the proper support for success, when things don’t fall according to plan, it is important to have a system that adapts. Growing a staff and culture that is able to manage a shift in plans, shows the strength and longevity of a company’s future.

Through the looking glass: prospecting a client through a different lens

The process to recruit a new hire must be able to accurately gauge their potential success based on the objectives of the company and the available position, whether it be through an in-person, phone or video interview. This can be achieved through either a two or five-step process.

The use of a two-step recruitment process is quick and simple. Screening the resume followed by an in-person interview is the best way to find a suitable candidate in the least amount of time since it requires little back and forth between the organization and potential employee. Two-step hiring also allows for a candidate’s on-boarding process to be streamlined in a time-efficient manner.

This type of recruitment process is best suited for quick hiring needs and helps distinguish warm versus hot leads. However, this process lacks the substance required to properly vet a large pool of seemingly quality recruits since the speed of hiring for an open position poses threats of under-qualified applicants.

In contrast, the five-step hiring system begins with a resume screen and is followed by a phone interview, video interview, in-person interview and finishes with on-the-job skill testing. This process is best used for positions that require deeper skillsets than average, allowing for interviewees to highlight their abilities over a lengthened period of time.

The five-step system is also ideal for positions with large applicant pools as each step in the hiring process will naturally separate top candidates from average candidates and grants hiring managers the time needed to properly evaluate a candidate’s potential and organizational fit. While this process allows for an in-depth evaluation of a future employee, it can be deemed too lengthy, causing candidates to lose interest and abandon the hiring process all together.

Not all hiring methods are the same, choose one that works best for the organization that will set you apart from your competition.