Tag: Employee


What’s more important – the degree or the experience?

With degrees becoming more and more common, the experience that a candidate brings to the position has taken the front seat in the hiring process. Needless to say, a degree does offer valuable skill important to a candidate’s resume.

The significance of completing a degree speaks to the candidate’s ability to be successful in various life and job-related aspects such as multi-tasking, social interactions, and ethical dilemmas. While the degree title and focus furthers the intellectual aspect of a candidate, it does not necessarily correlate to how much success a person will have within their position.

Experience is considerably the most valuable aspect a candidate can possess. The real-world experience that is transferable to the position in mind, provides far deeper insight as to how the employee will perform in a certain situation rather than the assumption of taught skills in the classroom.

However, a degree should not be any less valuable. Many entry qualifications for open positions specifically highlight the need of a degree to advance. Where the experience begins to overshadow a degree is through the interview process and the ability of a candidate to equate actual experiential moments to the demands of the job.

While the accomplishment of completing the route of higher education is still highly regarded in job recruiting, having first-hand knowledge of the qualifications that are to be expected has started to become the frontrunner when choosing between candidates with virtually similar resumes.

Employee Company Reviews – how important are they?

Employee reviews can reveal a lot about an organization. Do you know what your employee reviews say about your company?

Sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed provide direct employee feedback about companies which can either make or break the recruitment process. Scouting for talent, in most cases, has a direct connection to how a company is perceived by its employees. So, how can organizations stay on top of these reviews and use them to their advantage?

Turn the critical reviews into opportunity! It is best to dedicate the needed time to monitor your online brand and use this feedback to make a difference in the company’s culture. Knowing the honest, and sometimes, painful truth about how employees discern their time within the business can help strengthen the structure of the workplace.

The idea of transparency should not be something to shy away from either. Knowing the ins and outs of a certain position or department and the impression it holds both internally and externally, will give managers the ability to identify weaknesses, be pragmatic and fill in the gaps recognized by employees.

Turning Over a New Leaf on Employee Turnover

The connotations associated with “employee turnover” are often negative. From lost costs to disruption in an organization, employee turnover does have significant risks that test the strength of a company and its structure.

What is often overlooked is the benefit that employee turnover may bring to the organization.

Zappos, an online shoe and clothing store, has been widely praised for its mindset surrounding employee satisfaction. In 2015, the company began offering its employees exit payments, an incentive given to those who were interested in the company but decided it was not a right fit for them. This incentive lead to approximately 14% of employees accepting the offer.

While some turnover is encouraged, the importance of organizational agility is two-fold. The ability for employees to manage their employment satisfaction translates into greater success, for those who stay with the company have a mindset committed to the company’s growth and future.  Wiith the possibility of sporadic, unplanned position vacancies, positioning the business model to react and absorb any negative repercussions takes time, commitment and understanding.

It is crucial to create a culture that recognizes employee turnover is not always negative but rather something that can offer a positive shift in skills, mindsets, and motivations for the workforce, ultimately lending to the success of an agile and proactive company.

Enhancing Your LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn remains to be one of the largest professional networking sites today – giving insight into the company and employee dynamic. When searching for a new career, keeping up with your personal LinkedIn profile and building your brand is an important aspect to any job search.

Your LinkedIn profile gives a quick snapshot of your experience and should be carefully constructed to provide recruiters with the most accurate depiction of who you are as an executive.

While an easy field to complete, adding a degree or certification level to the name portion of your profile increases the chances of coming up in recruiting search results. Following your name is the headline – a highly undervalued profile segment that should answer who you are, what you do and how you can help (Forbes, 2017). Consider this to be the most important aspect of your profile as it is, besides your name, the first and possibly, the last thing a recruiter sees.

Your summary should go one step further to engage with recruiters. This portion of your profile is suggested to include a summarization of measurable goals and attention grabbing achievements. It should answer who you are and what you do on a deeper and more intimate level. This field, while engaging, should be concise and effective. Ensure that if anyone stops looking at your profile at this moment, they have a good understanding of your current passions and future goals.

Your experience should be organized in a way that highlights how you handle problem-solution situations. Having quantifiable details that address what the problem was, the steps that were taken and the results achieved will quickly showcase your experiential skill set. As always, it is important to use key words and integrate the skills that were gained in each situation. Your professional experience is a way for recruiters to see if your achievements fit well based on what the company is looking for in a candidate.

By enhancing and articulating these sections of your LinkedIn profile not only will you grab the attention of recruiters and like-minded colleagues but it allows you to continue the professional demeanor that has been established throughout your professional career.

Coaching and Development Replaces Performance Management

Twenty years ago, if you asked any employee how they were evaluated in their job, they would most likely say through employee performance ratings – a system designed to rank the performance of employees against colleagues strictly measured through output. Today, companies are turning towards a new regime of employee performance ratings – a system based on skills and attitude with the ability to drive change.

Managers who provide regular feedback and opportunities for growth and improvement are far more likely to have high-performers and greater employee satisfaction responses. The focus on coaching and development is becoming a priority in the workforce as more and more executives have found significant links to overall business success.

Now managers must dedicate time managing and communicating the importance of performance ownership with their direct reports. Coaching requires an open mindset, willing to build and progress rather than evaluate. Most importantly, managers must recognize the complete separation between performance and employee compensation.

A shift towards this progressive movement starts with senior leaders acknowledging the need to use performance management as a way to build skills. Managers need to be taught to provide valuable feedback that encourages their employees to further excel in their role.

Expanding the Sourcing Scope

Every day, it seems as if new recruitment job board websites come into the market constantly, making it harder for potential candidates to stand out and even harder for companies to acquire qualified talent. As the need for quality talent becomes more prevalent, companies must consider broadening their sourcing scope and seeking alternative solutions.

Employers must take full advantage of the resources that are available today by not overlooking cross-industry hiring. By expanding the view on the type of talent acquisition, companies will have the benefit of individuals trained in other departments, whom often, gain experience that correlates with the open position. A diverse workplace culture and sets of opinions appeals to different markets, which can help the company grow to a market outside of the initial targeted ideation.

Consider meritocracy. While the skills and experience that someone has are important to the success of the role, focusing on the ability and motivation that such employee possesses leads to greater drive for advancement in employees. This drive then positively translates into better overall company financial performance – encouraging employees to work hard for earned workplace promotions.

Rely on different sources. While employee referrals are an obvious source of talented potentials, reaching out on social platforms such as LinkedIn or industry Facebook pages may come up with surprising results. By expanding the scope that most companies have become accustomed to searching for potential hires through, the company will be able to diversify its culture and grow with a work environment that is slowly transitioning to multi-dimensional positions.

Compensation Budgeting

Budgeting is always a hot topic when it comes to employee benefits, which can sometimes lead to recruiters feeling as if their budget is stretched too thin to cover everything that is wanted in the workplace. But, it doesn’t need to be like that – here are some simple tricks to making the most out of a tight budget:

  • Offer competitive non-salary benefits. Make up for a lack of monetary incentives with benefits catered towards the employee’s needs. Offering childcare support, flexible schedules, office space, remote working opportunities and other chances for employees to feel valued is a great alternative that does not require salary-impacted benefits – rather, focus on employee work-life balance.
  • Focus on what’s important. There are items that can be considered “must-haves” that will make a huge difference in the day-to-day work life. Prioritizing items that are “must-haves” versus the “nice-to-haves.” Do this by ensuring the expenses are worth every penny.
  • Forecast – it’s vital to a healthy workplace budget. Keep in mind that staffing will change in the next year whether you see it coming or not. It is important to plan for these changes and leave a bit of budgetary room available to account for those changes, especially considering employee compensation.
  • Understand that you will not always be right. Whatever compensation package is offered, it is never going to be the best thing for every employee, and that is okay. Realize the biggest factors that will lead to company and employee success. One of the best ways to show appreciation for employees is fair compensation, so focus your attention on the benefits that will make the biggest impact for the largest number of employees.

 

Communicating expectations in an interview

Many times, to attain top candidates, job expectations and job realities do not always coincide. Significant responsibility is placed on the company to set realistic expectations from day one, so the possibility of a future dissatisfied employee is lessened.

Setting job responsibilities needs to be the priority. While responsibilities may vary, providing a framework of what to expect from day to day will give the candidate a better understanding of what they will be doing. This is an excellent opportunity for management to identify specific job duties to decrease the possibility of task overlap, making for a better operating workplace.

With the changing work place culture, in many cases, the expectations for business hours vary from position to position. However, it is important to alleviate the frustrations of either working too much or too little than what is expected by outlining specific office hour expectations. Finding an employee who is unwilling to work more than 40 hours may be detrimental to the success of them in that position; it is better to outline those expectations sooner than later.

An expectation for company culture should be drawn out before making a hire as well. If extracurricular office activities are a large part of the social side of the business, the candidate should know that they may be asked to participate in them. The social aspect of a company plays a significant role in employee satisfaction, and it would be advantageous to promote culture the right away to understand if the candidate will be a good fit.

 

The Power of Employee Referrals

Tapping into the tremendous advantage of employee referrals can ultimately translate into a successful hire, yielding high results in the long run.

Job seekers first go to their network for potential job leads. Keeping current employees in the loop allows them the opportunity to actively search for someone that would be a good fit for the open position. This is also advantageous when searching for a specialized role as the employee may have referrals outside of the particular job industry.

Time is money and hiring a referred candidate requires less money and time than a traditional candidate. The process and costs of creating a job post, waiting for applicable resumes and scanning for potential hires are tedious and can lead to potentially poor results. However, only an interview is needed for a referred candidate.

Having a familiar contact in the business will also make the onboarding process a lot faster. The advantage of having someone the new candidate can trust and turn to with questions will allow them to acclimate to the culture a lot faster than others who need time to adjust and find their peer confidant.

Both the referred candidate and employee who successfully referred the candidate will be more inclined to stay in their respective positions longer. Because there is pressure on the achievement of a referred candidate for the current employee, the quality of referrals is greater than those found through traditional means. Once the referred candidate is successfully brought on, the current employee feels better with a greater sense of trust for the organization since they are a part of the company’s growing future.

While employee referrals remain to be one of the most successful ways to hire, it is not a system that can be based on just word-of-mouth communication. A specific process must be established for employees or external connections to provide candidate leads. Ask for referrals and leave the door open for potentials – while you may not be currently hiring, it’s nice to continuously add to the talent pipeline.

Appealing to Passive Candidates

Active versus passive candidates seem to be a constant topic of discussion. Whether the applicant is actively pursuing a position or has passively encountered the organization, it is important to maintain an active line of external communication to display the culture of the company and cultivate a high level of interest with the candidate.

According to a 2017 examination, 89% of people within the workforce are either somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs. However, in December of 2016, a survey by CareerBuilder.com reported that “more than one in five workers (22 percent) are planning to change jobs in 2017.”

These “planners,” or passive candidates, are considered to be desirable because they are content with where they are. There is less competition when speaking with these candidates because they are not actively searching and the candidates are more inclined to speak truthfully since there is no pressure of a job. So, how can you position yourself to appeal to active job seekers but still engage with the passive candidates?

Keep up with social media! This is an ever-changing but entirely influential area of business that needs to be at the top of the list when it comes to finding the right candidate. A great post can instantly be shared by others and can reach a large amount of people. Social media fosters a way to build relationships and communicate in an informal way that is reflective of the culture that the company will bring.

Create a talent pipeline. Develop and maintain a list of potential candidates who may, either today or in the future, be in search of a position within the company to allow a pipeline of passive candidates in the event a position becomes available, it is easy to reach out and sell the opportunity that would position them for advancement.

Companies must always encourage employee referrals. This should be a primary source for candidate searches since most active or semi-active job seekers reach out to their friends first to seek job leads. This recruitment method allows employees to actively speak on behalf of the company, creating the opportunity for great and reliable candidate engagement.

Consider the candidate’s experience. Design an employee application and interview process that works with all types of candidates. It is important to continue the efficiency of the interview process in order to secure the best candidate for the job.