Tag: Expectations


Creating a Recruitment Talent Campaign

 

When trying to attract top talent, the vacant position must stand out amongst the clutter of other eligible opportunities. Establishing a talent recruitment campaign allows both employers and employees to actively align goals and interests in a cultivating way.

Setting clear and measurable goals can be a great start when creating any recruitment campaign. Asking questions like “How many people do we want this to reach?” or “By what margin do we want to increase our overall audience?” allows for quantifiable marks to be set and evaluated throughout the process. When objectives and the end goal is understood, it determines the success built before and achieved after recruitment.

Determining the audience should be the second part of the campaign. It is important to develop a unique communicative platform through company culture videos, social media promotions, evaluating and reviewing glass door reviews and provide community-related blog posts. This will allow prospective candidates to evaluate the value proposition of the company and be the center of any talent recruitment practice.

While those platforms should exhibit the culture, they should also integrate a call to action. A call to action clearly separates the recruiting pool from those that are curious and those that are serious. It should be visible on all facets of communication with potential employees and should be direct and explanatory – providing further insight or action to those that interact.

Talent campaigns are meant to be unique to the position or organization. While every business may be using the same platform to get their message across, influencing those platforms to align with the goals that were initially established will provide recruits with an understanding of what the company has to offer and how they will be part of the success, and significant contributions to the future of the organization.

Hiring Quality Talent

Believe it or not, identifying a quality hire goes beyond a stacked resume or great recommendations. In fact, there are actually measurable calculations associated with quality hires based off of the goals of the company filling the position.

Quality hires can be attributed to the use of performance-based objectives established during the hiring process. Rather than identifying surface level qualities that must be met in the recruitment stage, such as education level or experience, direct objectives for identified success should be highlighted with goals and expectations being the prime focus.

Rather than a bulleted list of duties, make the job compelling to begin the employee “buy-in” process. Turn the description into an impactful story allowing for any potential candidate to begin to see the impact they can make. This will help garner strong candidates, fully interested in what the position has to offer and how they can be of service.

Focus on the past rather than the present. If a new hire is able to equate their past experiences with one comparable to those listed in the performance-based job description, they will have increased motivation to continue that trend of success as they already possess the skills and accomplishments to do so.

It is important to evaluate the quality of the candidate, pre-hire and post-hire. Before the candidate is offered the position, focus on past accomplishments and understand how they can support overall goals and objectives. This same process should be used post-hire as well. Once the candidate is on the job, circle back to the interview process and the agreements that were reached and experiences that were mentioned – this will help categorize employees as quality hires or can pinpoint weaknesses that need to be addressed.

The Advantages of Job Shadowing

Having the opportunity to shadow senior leadership when beginning a career or transitioning to a new position provides countless benefits, specifically, the resources and skillsets that are available in a shortened timeframe. But, why choose shadowing versus another on-boarding system when welcoming a new employee?

Shadowing is most important when the position is best learned through seeing or doing. The new hire is able to take in a plethora of information that, if trained through a different method, might be overlooked or not mentioned. It provides a “hands-on” approach to a position that may require a “hands-on” mindset.

The ability to learn firsthand from leaders who have forged their own path to success is second to none. The time spent with senior employees opens to the door to understand the ins and outs of the company culture, fine-tune and continue to develop professionally, and gain expert insights into the business. Shadowing also expedites the on-boarding process as new hires begin to acquaint themselves with the business sooner.

Job shadowing provides a behind-the-curtain look at the expectations of job duties, key deliverables needed, and the interactions between coworkers and peers and coworkers and senior management. This provides an excellent chance for senior management to recognize if processes, job descriptions or culture needs to be restructured or reevaluated.

Employee Company Reviews – how important are they?

Employee reviews can reveal a lot about an organization. Do you know what your employee reviews say about your company?

Sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed provide direct employee feedback about companies which can either make or break the recruitment process. Scouting for talent, in most cases, has a direct connection to how a company is perceived by its employees. So, how can organizations stay on top of these reviews and use them to their advantage?

Turn the critical reviews into opportunity! It is best to dedicate the needed time to monitor your online brand and use this feedback to make a difference in the company’s culture. Knowing the honest, and sometimes, painful truth about how employees discern their time within the business can help strengthen the structure of the workplace.

The idea of transparency should not be something to shy away from either. Knowing the ins and outs of a certain position or department and the impression it holds both internally and externally, will give managers the ability to identify weaknesses, be pragmatic and fill in the gaps recognized by employees.

Attracting Out-Of-Town Talent

Skills, compatibility, and drive – these are a just a few characteristics companies seek in potential new hires; however, there could be other various factors which makes a candidate more favorable. For instance, geographic location plays a large role in determining the difference between a suitable candidate and the perfect candidate.

The key to successfully broadening the hiring search pool is to understand the work style and abilities of the prospective hire and communicating how the company is invested in their future.

In order to attract job-seekers from in and around the company’s geographic location, focus on the industry and economic environment of the company that the employee may relocate to. Does this transition provide the best path for success and growth?

Rather than looking at the qualifications of a job, it is important to understand how, outside of the corporate structure, this candidate can find success and be happy about the decision to move. Highlight the location of the company by sharing favorite parts of the city and why many have chosen to build a career there.

Continue to stay true to the company’s roots. Make the culture of the workplace a central part of the discussion. Focus on the people, values, and opportunity the company has found success with as those qualities are what will continue the cycle of achievement.

What to do when a candidate goes dark

As a recruiter, one of the most important aspects of the job is keeping candidates interested in the opportunity. Every so often, a candidate goes dark – all communication stops out of the blue and when this happens, it feels as if all progress that has been made has been lost.

What can be done on the recruitment end to alleviate the stress that comes when a candidate goes cold?

Emphasize the importance of communication and set deadlines for response time. It is important to begin the relationship through various methods of communication; if the candidate does go dark, a call to “check up” is routine rather than desperate. While establishing the relationship, understand how active the candidate is in their search and their timeline to transition into a new opportunity.

Gain their respect and trust. Guide the candidate as an advisor in their search, helping steer them in a direction you believe to be the best move for their future. A candidate is far less inclined to go dark if they trust who they are talking to and have faith in the system.

Should you execute these tips, but to no avail, run into a candidate where all communication has stopped, you must then evaluate if the candidate is worth the time. Should you change gears and move on to a candidate that would be more than eager to be given the opportunity? You may begin to spend more time trying to connect with a lost connection rather than building a relationship with a zealous one.

Transitioning to the C-Suite

The ascension to the C-Suite is often paired with redesigned goals and ideas to ensure success in the new role. Fostering a successful transition can bring challenges as aligning others around those specific objectives is not always an easy feat.

To combat these common struggles, it is best to establish a shared vision on company priorities. Aligning the organization to understand and believe in the strategic design of the organization is a critical component to build success when executives are promoted or have accepted  a senior role. By creating an environment where employees buy-in to the vision of the company, executives will work to establish an immediate and long-term impact in the foundation of the organization.

Accepting that the answers are not always clear, and can be a significant learning curve during any transition. Making quick and calculated moves to establish a trustworthy team allows for any executive to begin to influence others with designed support.

Taking all of this into account, nothing can be done without the thought and preparation of self-readiness. By designating the appropriate amount of time to a purposeful tenure, ascending into the C-Suite will be complimented with proven results.

Turning Over a New Leaf on Employee Turnover

The connotations associated with “employee turnover” are often negative. From lost costs to disruption in an organization, employee turnover does have significant risks that test the strength of a company and its structure.

What is often overlooked is the benefit that employee turnover may bring to the organization.

Zappos, an online shoe and clothing store, has been widely praised for its mindset surrounding employee satisfaction. In 2015, the company began offering its employees exit payments, an incentive given to those who were interested in the company but decided it was not a right fit for them. This incentive lead to approximately 14% of employees accepting the offer.

While some turnover is encouraged, the importance of organizational agility is two-fold. The ability for employees to manage their employment satisfaction translates into greater success, for those who stay with the company have a mindset committed to the company’s growth and future.  Wiith the possibility of sporadic, unplanned position vacancies, positioning the business model to react and absorb any negative repercussions takes time, commitment and understanding.

It is crucial to create a culture that recognizes employee turnover is not always negative but rather something that can offer a positive shift in skills, mindsets, and motivations for the workforce, ultimately lending to the success of an agile and proactive company.

Adapting for the 21st century


Corporate America has begun to transition into a new way of thinking for employees. The days of lifelong careers are no longer in sight as “over seven million of today’s jobs are expected to disappear by 2020” (SagePeople, 2017).

Employers have been forced to make a swift adjustment to cater to the disruption of the work force. By transforming the current employee mentality, employers will be able to evolve the company to match the new revolution and alleviate the risk of failure.

As the need for instant gratification grows so does the eagerness of employees to experience many different roles to see what fits best. Employees are looking to expand their skillset and transition horizontally, being less focused on vertical advancements but interested, rather, in lateral changes. A higher value is placed on unending learned and development, acquiring new skills as they transition within their career.

This change in mentality is a great opportunity for employers to adapt and face the challenges head on. Proactively engaging employees and offering the opportunity for optimum success will counteract any downfalls that may be experienced. With a constant rotating employee pool, recruiters can more selectively pick talent lending the chance to establish a workplace foundation focused on staff retention.

Employers can begin to mold key positions and mitigate the potential hit of the shifting employee mindset by identifying the key roles that are going to bring success in the future and pinpointing impactful skillsets. Abilities such as creativity, logical reasoning and problem solving will be held at a higher regard in future occupations (SagePeople, 2017).

The change of the workplace is inevitable and evolving quickly. Focusing on meaningful position development and employee support will help relieve the impact of the predicted unsettled employee mindset.

Mastering performance reviews

Performance reviews – a historically dreaded time in the office. Understanding how to take advantage of the review process and what personal and organizational improvements can be made will help both managers and employees alike to develop as an employee and contribute more to the company.

Meetings between manager and employee allows for the construction of individualized plans geared toward success. Not only do these conversations open a clear line of communication and transparency but they align company and employee goals and strategy. Setting goals that are smart, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely (S.M.A.R.T.) allows employees to prioritize their work in the coming months based on personal and company goals.

And while performance reviews provide managers and employees the chance to speak openly about position performance, no review should come as a surprise. Employees should be aware of their strengths and weaknesses beforehand allowing the time allotted for a performance review to be focused on goals to improve or further success. The categories that are being evaluated must be clearly outlined to establish a clear line of expectations.

After the performance review, managers should take the time to review their notes that were taken during the meeting. Rather than stuffing the file into a folder and storing until the next performance review comes up, taking the time to map out a timeline of the milestones that the employee must hit to be considered successful is important to continue departmental success. This practice will not only provide managers the ability to map out their expectations, but it will also provide an insight into practices within the office that may require more focus.

One-on-one reviews are great to establish relationships between managers and employees; however, creating a system that allows the department to anonymously submit general feedback and personal role evaluation allows the opportunity for staff to identify micro-level needs regarding professional development.