Tag: Goals


Creating a Recruitment Talent Campaign

 

When trying to attract top talent, the vacant position must stand out amongst the clutter of other eligible opportunities. Establishing a talent recruitment campaign allows both employers and employees to actively align goals and interests in a cultivating way.

Setting clear and measurable goals can be a great start when creating any recruitment campaign. Asking questions like “How many people do we want this to reach?” or “By what margin do we want to increase our overall audience?” allows for quantifiable marks to be set and evaluated throughout the process. When objectives and the end goal is understood, it determines the success built before and achieved after recruitment.

Determining the audience should be the second part of the campaign. It is important to develop a unique communicative platform through company culture videos, social media promotions, evaluating and reviewing glass door reviews and provide community-related blog posts. This will allow prospective candidates to evaluate the value proposition of the company and be the center of any talent recruitment practice.

While those platforms should exhibit the culture, they should also integrate a call to action. A call to action clearly separates the recruiting pool from those that are curious and those that are serious. It should be visible on all facets of communication with potential employees and should be direct and explanatory – providing further insight or action to those that interact.

Talent campaigns are meant to be unique to the position or organization. While every business may be using the same platform to get their message across, influencing those platforms to align with the goals that were initially established will provide recruits with an understanding of what the company has to offer and how they will be part of the success, and significant contributions to the future of the organization.

How to approach counteroffers

Negotiating pay is a difficult situation when offered the job of your dreams. While the job description may check all of the boxes, compensation is also a major determinant in whether you should accept the position or not.

There is a certain threshold that employers will withstand when in the counteroffer stage of hiring. By doing your research and recognizing the market compensation wage bands, you will set yourself up for far better success than by countering the future of your career blindly. Trust the process as you think about negotiating an offer once it has been presented.  Seek counsel from a professional to guide and lead you through each phase of the negotiation.

When countering the offer, focus on why you want to join the organization and what is important to you at this stage of your career.   There are other benefits can be included as part of the compensation package which can include, commute time, work-hour flexibility, job responsibilities, family support, and ability to contribute in the strategic success of the company. Focus on how your dream job can transform more than just your bank account.

Countering what you feel is deserved can be effective when done properly. If conducted correctly, counteroffers can provide better benefits, incentives, job security, and ultimately pay for a job that was already a dream to begin with.

What constitutes a transformational leader?

There is an overwhelming sense of responsibility taken on by any leader. Strong leadership evokes a belief in the shared vision and the charisma to guide others has the ability to propel the strengths of the team. The way employees define their manager’s leadership style, has a large impact on the continuation of a successful leadership cycle.

There are nine identified frameworks of leadership styles – transformational, transactional, laissez-faire, servant, autocratic, democratic, bureaucratic, charismatic and situational. With these nine styles, also comes nine different ways a team can define their leader’s approach. Believing in a one-size-fits-all methodology may cause more adversity than prosperity. Leaders must have the ability to adapt their leadership strategy to fit the situation and their employees.

The responsibility taken on by any leader is more than just a guide towards the right direction. A leader must be willing to make the hard decisions, earn the trust and respect of his/her employees, believe and articulate a shared goal, and inspire people to do their best. Having the foresight to know what may lie ahead and recognize that a shared vision will distinguish a transformational leader from the rest.

What’s more important – the degree or the experience?

With degrees becoming more and more common, the experience that a candidate brings to the position has taken the front seat in the hiring process. Needless to say, a degree does offer valuable skill important to a candidate’s resume.

The significance of completing a degree speaks to the candidate’s ability to be successful in various life and job-related aspects such as multi-tasking, social interactions, and ethical dilemmas. While the degree title and focus furthers the intellectual aspect of a candidate, it does not necessarily correlate to how much success a person will have within their position.

Experience is considerably the most valuable aspect a candidate can possess. The real-world experience that is transferable to the position in mind, provides far deeper insight as to how the employee will perform in a certain situation rather than the assumption of taught skills in the classroom.

However, a degree should not be any less valuable. Many entry qualifications for open positions specifically highlight the need of a degree to advance. Where the experience begins to overshadow a degree is through the interview process and the ability of a candidate to equate actual experiential moments to the demands of the job.

While the accomplishment of completing the route of higher education is still highly regarded in job recruiting, having first-hand knowledge of the qualifications that are to be expected has started to become the frontrunner when choosing between candidates with virtually similar resumes.

Is your company brand more than just a logo?

In today’s society, attention is critical for success. If a company is unable to grasp and maintain the attention of customers, there is significant risk in getting lost in the mix of a hundred other businesses designed to provide their necessary services. The importance behind building a relationship beyond the brand name should be at the forefront of a company’s business model.

To go beyond a title and design on the company letterhead, there must be support, guidance and belief to push towards overall success. A company should be recognized by what it can provide both internally to its employees and externally to the community.

Offering the opportunity for employees to “buy in” to the process and ultimately, the success of the brand will translate to customers buying in as well. When employees are satisfied with the organization they are a part of and its values, it is much easier to attract customers who are satisfied with what the company offers as well. Employee benefits, incentives, and recognition opens the door for employees to create a cycle of positivity as they begin to recognize the support given, appreciate the opportunity and project the company values into customers.

Externally, standing out to your customers should also be more than the obvious. It should be supported through interactions, consistency, availability and appreciation. Having a brand that guarantees pleasant interactions, consistently provides a satisfactory product and/or experience, goes beyond the status quo. Acknowledging the dedication of loyal customers is guaranteed to maintain consumer share of mind.

While other companies offer the same products and services, going above and beyond for both customers and employees, will help the company become a brand, distinguishing itself from the competition and paving the way toward a tenured future.

Hiring Quality Talent

Believe it or not, identifying a quality hire goes beyond a stacked resume or great recommendations. In fact, there are actually measurable calculations associated with quality hires based off of the goals of the company filling the position.

Quality hires can be attributed to the use of performance-based objectives established during the hiring process. Rather than identifying surface level qualities that must be met in the recruitment stage, such as education level or experience, direct objectives for identified success should be highlighted with goals and expectations being the prime focus.

Rather than a bulleted list of duties, make the job compelling to begin the employee “buy-in” process. Turn the description into an impactful story allowing for any potential candidate to begin to see the impact they can make. This will help garner strong candidates, fully interested in what the position has to offer and how they can be of service.

Focus on the past rather than the present. If a new hire is able to equate their past experiences with one comparable to those listed in the performance-based job description, they will have increased motivation to continue that trend of success as they already possess the skills and accomplishments to do so.

It is important to evaluate the quality of the candidate, pre-hire and post-hire. Before the candidate is offered the position, focus on past accomplishments and understand how they can support overall goals and objectives. This same process should be used post-hire as well. Once the candidate is on the job, circle back to the interview process and the agreements that were reached and experiences that were mentioned – this will help categorize employees as quality hires or can pinpoint weaknesses that need to be addressed.

The Impact of a New Position

Creating a new position is, in most cases, associated with filling a need for a specific role that is lacking within the company’s current business model. What is often overlooked is the impact it has on employee morale and overall view of the business opportunities.

Whether it be an entry-level or C-suite position, the addition of an employee’s career progression heightens the outlook of the company as it shows strength, sustainability, and regard for growth in its employees. Investing in the company’s support system not only positively correlates with business success but, contributes to maintaining a stable and continued future.

By creating a new position, the culture of current employees shifts to recognize and appreciate the support their existing position will be backed by. This can allow for duties to be redistributed and focus to be reprioritized to maintain continuity and support of overall values for the organization.

On the other hand, the creation of an executive position highlights the ideals of continuous employee growth. With a new executive-level added, companies are able to show their investment in the employees, emphasizing a culture of sustainability. Not only will lower-level employees aim to advance towards new levels but, current top executives will be motivated to continue to learn and grow within the organization.

While adding a new position may fill a void in the company’s overall business structure, the impact that a new position holds for current and incoming employees is far greater than what meets the eye.

Transitioning to the C-Suite

The ascension to the C-Suite is often paired with redesigned goals and ideas to ensure success in the new role. Fostering a successful transition can bring challenges as aligning others around those specific objectives is not always an easy feat.

To combat these common struggles, it is best to establish a shared vision on company priorities. Aligning the organization to understand and believe in the strategic design of the organization is a critical component to build success when executives are promoted or have accepted  a senior role. By creating an environment where employees buy-in to the vision of the company, executives will work to establish an immediate and long-term impact in the foundation of the organization.

Accepting that the answers are not always clear, and can be a significant learning curve during any transition. Making quick and calculated moves to establish a trustworthy team allows for any executive to begin to influence others with designed support.

Taking all of this into account, nothing can be done without the thought and preparation of self-readiness. By designating the appropriate amount of time to a purposeful tenure, ascending into the C-Suite will be complimented with proven results.

Adapting for the 21st century


Corporate America has begun to transition into a new way of thinking for employees. The days of lifelong careers are no longer in sight as “over seven million of today’s jobs are expected to disappear by 2020” (SagePeople, 2017).

Employers have been forced to make a swift adjustment to cater to the disruption of the work force. By transforming the current employee mentality, employers will be able to evolve the company to match the new revolution and alleviate the risk of failure.

As the need for instant gratification grows so does the eagerness of employees to experience many different roles to see what fits best. Employees are looking to expand their skillset and transition horizontally, being less focused on vertical advancements but interested, rather, in lateral changes. A higher value is placed on unending learned and development, acquiring new skills as they transition within their career.

This change in mentality is a great opportunity for employers to adapt and face the challenges head on. Proactively engaging employees and offering the opportunity for optimum success will counteract any downfalls that may be experienced. With a constant rotating employee pool, recruiters can more selectively pick talent lending the chance to establish a workplace foundation focused on staff retention.

Employers can begin to mold key positions and mitigate the potential hit of the shifting employee mindset by identifying the key roles that are going to bring success in the future and pinpointing impactful skillsets. Abilities such as creativity, logical reasoning and problem solving will be held at a higher regard in future occupations (SagePeople, 2017).

The change of the workplace is inevitable and evolving quickly. Focusing on meaningful position development and employee support will help relieve the impact of the predicted unsettled employee mindset.

Mastering performance reviews

Performance reviews – a historically dreaded time in the office. Understanding how to take advantage of the review process and what personal and organizational improvements can be made will help both managers and employees alike to develop as an employee and contribute more to the company.

Meetings between manager and employee allows for the construction of individualized plans geared toward success. Not only do these conversations open a clear line of communication and transparency but they align company and employee goals and strategy. Setting goals that are smart, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely (S.M.A.R.T.) allows employees to prioritize their work in the coming months based on personal and company goals.

And while performance reviews provide managers and employees the chance to speak openly about position performance, no review should come as a surprise. Employees should be aware of their strengths and weaknesses beforehand allowing the time allotted for a performance review to be focused on goals to improve or further success. The categories that are being evaluated must be clearly outlined to establish a clear line of expectations.

After the performance review, managers should take the time to review their notes that were taken during the meeting. Rather than stuffing the file into a folder and storing until the next performance review comes up, taking the time to map out a timeline of the milestones that the employee must hit to be considered successful is important to continue departmental success. This practice will not only provide managers the ability to map out their expectations, but it will also provide an insight into practices within the office that may require more focus.

One-on-one reviews are great to establish relationships between managers and employees; however, creating a system that allows the department to anonymously submit general feedback and personal role evaluation allows the opportunity for staff to identify micro-level needs regarding professional development.