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Tag: Goals


Targeting End of the Year Priorities

It’s hard to believe that 2017 is already almost halfway done. Now, comes the time to take a look back and reflect on the goals set out at the beginning of the year and realign your priorities focus on your goals for the remainder of the year and finish strong!

While it may sound tedious, the number one priority for a leader approaching the second half of the year is building upon employee engagement and satisfaction. Satisfying existing employees will decrease the need for new talent acquisition. Engaged employees are happy employees, and those employees contribute positively to the overall success of the company. Defining career development initiatives and actively listening to concerns allows for employees to feel as if they can make a difference and impact on the organization.

As with every industry, new technology continues to shape the way organizations conduct business, impacting systems, processes, and people. And as much as some people may be trying to avoid the technological boom, the digital age is here to stay. It is important to keep up with technical innovation and develop strategies that advance the company to competitive heights. Innovative processes and new business models may need to be developed to support the movement. However, such implementations will lead to great success in the long run and will set you apart from other traditional companies.

None of these priorities are possible without satisfied employees that embrace the vision and strategy for the organization. Recruitment and retention should be a top priority leading into the second half of 2017. Think about establishing a formal recruitment strategy and hiring the talent of the future. This will significantly impact your organizational culture and create future success.

Coaching and Development Replaces Performance Management

Twenty years ago, if you asked any employee how they were evaluated in their job, they would most likely say through employee performance ratings – a system designed to rank the performance of employees against colleagues strictly measured through output. Today, companies are turning towards a new regime of employee performance ratings – a system based on skills and attitude with the ability to drive change.

Managers who provide regular feedback and opportunities for growth and improvement are far more likely to have high-performers and greater employee satisfaction responses. The focus on coaching and development is becoming a priority in the workforce as more and more executives have found significant links to overall business success.

Now managers must dedicate time managing and communicating the importance of performance ownership with their direct reports. Coaching requires an open mindset, willing to build and progress rather than evaluate. Most importantly, managers must recognize the complete separation between performance and employee compensation.

A shift towards this progressive movement starts with senior leaders acknowledging the need to use performance management as a way to build skills. Managers need to be taught to provide valuable feedback that encourages their employees to further excel in their role.

Expanding the Sourcing Scope

Every day, it seems as if new recruitment job board websites come into the market constantly, making it harder for potential candidates to stand out and even harder for companies to acquire qualified talent. As the need for quality talent becomes more prevalent, companies must consider broadening their sourcing scope and seeking alternative solutions.

Employers must take full advantage of the resources that are available today by not overlooking cross-industry hiring. By expanding the view on the type of talent acquisition, companies will have the benefit of individuals trained in other departments, whom often, gain experience that correlates with the open position. A diverse workplace culture and sets of opinions appeals to different markets, which can help the company grow to a market outside of the initial targeted ideation.

Consider meritocracy. While the skills and experience that someone has are important to the success of the role, focusing on the ability and motivation that such employee possesses leads to greater drive for advancement in employees. This drive then positively translates into better overall company financial performance – encouraging employees to work hard for earned workplace promotions.

Rely on different sources. While employee referrals are an obvious source of talented potentials, reaching out on social platforms such as LinkedIn or industry Facebook pages may come up with surprising results. By expanding the scope that most companies have become accustomed to searching for potential hires through, the company will be able to diversify its culture and grow with a work environment that is slowly transitioning to multi-dimensional positions.

The Power of Employee Referrals

Tapping into the tremendous advantage of employee referrals can ultimately translate into a successful hire, yielding high results in the long run.

Job seekers first go to their network for potential job leads. Keeping current employees in the loop allows them the opportunity to actively search for someone that would be a good fit for the open position. This is also advantageous when searching for a specialized role as the employee may have referrals outside of the particular job industry.

Time is money and hiring a referred candidate requires less money and time than a traditional candidate. The process and costs of creating a job post, waiting for applicable resumes and scanning for potential hires are tedious and can lead to potentially poor results. However, only an interview is needed for a referred candidate.

Having a familiar contact in the business will also make the onboarding process a lot faster. The advantage of having someone the new candidate can trust and turn to with questions will allow them to acclimate to the culture a lot faster than others who need time to adjust and find their peer confidant.

Both the referred candidate and employee who successfully referred the candidate will be more inclined to stay in their respective positions longer. Because there is pressure on the achievement of a referred candidate for the current employee, the quality of referrals is greater than those found through traditional means. Once the referred candidate is successfully brought on, the current employee feels better with a greater sense of trust for the organization since they are a part of the company’s growing future.

While employee referrals remain to be one of the most successful ways to hire, it is not a system that can be based on just word-of-mouth communication. A specific process must be established for employees or external connections to provide candidate leads. Ask for referrals and leave the door open for potentials – while you may not be currently hiring, it’s nice to continuously add to the talent pipeline.

Appealing to Passive Candidates

Active versus passive candidates seem to be a constant topic of discussion. Whether the applicant is actively pursuing a position or has passively encountered the organization, it is important to maintain an active line of external communication to display the culture of the company and cultivate a high level of interest with the candidate.

According to a 2017 examination, 89% of people within the workforce are either somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs. However, in December of 2016, a survey by CareerBuilder.com reported that “more than one in five workers (22 percent) are planning to change jobs in 2017.”

These “planners,” or passive candidates, are considered to be desirable because they are content with where they are. There is less competition when speaking with these candidates because they are not actively searching and the candidates are more inclined to speak truthfully since there is no pressure of a job. So, how can you position yourself to appeal to active job seekers but still engage with the passive candidates?

Keep up with social media! This is an ever-changing but entirely influential area of business that needs to be at the top of the list when it comes to finding the right candidate. A great post can instantly be shared by others and can reach a large amount of people. Social media fosters a way to build relationships and communicate in an informal way that is reflective of the culture that the company will bring.

Create a talent pipeline. Develop and maintain a list of potential candidates who may, either today or in the future, be in search of a position within the company to allow a pipeline of passive candidates in the event a position becomes available, it is easy to reach out and sell the opportunity that would position them for advancement.

Companies must always encourage employee referrals. This should be a primary source for candidate searches since most active or semi-active job seekers reach out to their friends first to seek job leads. This recruitment method allows employees to actively speak on behalf of the company, creating the opportunity for great and reliable candidate engagement.

Consider the candidate’s experience. Design an employee application and interview process that works with all types of candidates. It is important to continue the efficiency of the interview process in order to secure the best candidate for the job.

Make a Difference

Working hard is only part of the equation. Time, dedication, loyalty, trust and various other qualities complete the workplace culture and overall job satisfaction. First, ask yourself a few questions: How can you step outside of the status quo? How can you make a difference in your company?

Begin with observation. Be open and receptive to changes and other viewpoints which will encourage the same from your employees. Learn and observe how the people you manage complete various tasks. If the there is an easier more efficient way, teach them. Once the culture of the company is established as a growing team rather than individual entities, the company will begin to benefit.

Be the energy you want to see. Encourage others and enlighten them through your positivity. As you walk into the office, smile and engage with your employees in an upbeat, personable way. Acknowledge a job well done and spark creativity. Others will begin to imitate the positive example you set making for an enjoyable workplace setting.

It is important to reach outside of your company walls as a team. Volunteer and be a member of your community. By doing so, it will help build your business relations and increase motivation and dedication to the firm. Helping others creates a sense of purpose, and if your company offers that sense of purpose, employees will be happier with the work they do in the office.

Accepting Feedback in an Executive Role

As senior executives move up the ranks, their skills and talents become solidified, making them more efficient in their job and less prone to receiving feedback.

While top executives may welcome criticism, most may not want to accept constructive feedback based upon their position or the level within the organization.

It is important to instill a constructive and creative way for top executives to receive feedback due to the success factors that can be reached within all levels of the organization managing at a high level.

Executives must be open to building relationships with subordinates and cultivating a culture built on strong, open communication. By doing so, employees at all levels will begin to integrate, openness into their work tasks with peers leading to ultimate success for projects and outward facing materials. Not only will employee trust be strengthened, but the entire culture of the organization will also thrive as both management and subordinates can actively engage in constructive communication and improvements.

Think of the organization as a blank slate. If the company was rebuilt today, what features of the current company would be brought into the new business? What features would be left behind? What employees would be brought in? What employees would not pass the interview process? By having top-level management take the time to examine these questions and intuitively look at the success and failures of the company, recommendations and a new path for implementation will become more evident. By creating an environment of feedback and coaching, it will provide a fresh outlook on the company processes while still allowing the executive accept feedback in an alternative way.

Executing Success

Every industry has found success in one way or another through individual processes and protocols. But how does one go about bringing in an entirely new executive with a different mindset, ideas, and work value construct while still maintaining a strong atmosphere?

Most importantly, get a head start and begin creating a list of expectations of the work that needs to be done. Prepare for a winning mindset by having a plan in place that will properly onboard any new executive or employee. Take advantage of the first 100 days of the job by relying on an action plan that integrates the mission and vision for the company.

Communicate with the new hire. While there may be a lot of information to give and for the executive to retain, stress the importance and the goal of the successful atmosphere that has been built. If you are unable to communicate the desires for the position, when something does occur, a rushed reaction may result, leading to chaos. Plan out what needs to be completed and effectively communicate the goals.

Build a team centered on success. Identify key members that will be an asset to the role and allow them to grow, learn and evolve with the new executive hire. A team built on trust and compatibility has all of the makings to continue a successful pattern of business. The most effective practices come from a collaborative team environment to ensure the companies strategic and operational initiatives are met with a successful team!

Recruiting Top Executives

When it comes to hiring for an executive level position, often a significant amount of time and effort must be committed to finding the right fit. But, where do you begin? How can companies pick the great executives out from the pool of many good executives?

The solution? Know the person you hire and know the traits you want.

Look for outstanding leadership qualities. Seek to understand how they would handle a team that they are working with. Ask about different strengths and weaknesses when dealing with specific scenarios in your company or area of expertise. Have they been able to build strong teams in the past? Have they seen great success in the work that they have completed in a team environment? These questions will not only highlight the type of work they have done that can be of benefit to your department but understanding these character traits will allow you to pinpoint qualities that may help the company grow in the future.

But what is leadership without an idea or action plan for growth? Finding a top executive that has an idea of how they want to grow and the steps that they are willing to take to succeed shows how focused they are on their goals and the future of the company. Ask about their plans for the role, should they be hired. Accept the feedback they may give on processes that they believe could be done more efficiently or may work fit with their style of work.

Signs of a good leader are everywhere. But to separate the great leaders from the good leaders, you must hire someone who will inspire others and push them to limits they never believed that they could reach. It is important that top executives collaborate well and are not afraid to get their hands dirty. They must know what needs to get done and believe in the process. Most importantly, however, they must believe in their team to get it done and help when need be. Not only will it result in goals being met by positive outcomes but also the entire workplace environment will begin to move in an active and collaborative direction.