Tag: Growth


Creating your Personal Brand as an Executive

The creation of an Executive Resume or LinkedIn Profile succinctly may not have been needed in the past, however, when opportunity knocks, it is best to be prepared and relevant. The process to obtain a C-Suite position requires specific innovative and strategic thinking by integrating technology and emphasizing on a strong personal brand.

While an Executive Resume may have been sufficient to land a new position a few years ago, in today’s modern age, it takes more effort than just quantitatively updating career accomplishments and community contributions. In most recruiting cases, there is significant weight placed on social branding.

Executives with an online social networking presence tend to be noticed more over than the traditional job search. Your profile should include strategic accomplishments, leadership qualities, and a proven track record of success in managing complex business initiatives. Establishing the proper brand is most important to ensure a clear message across all professional and social channels.

By identifying an appropriate and desirable value proposition that supports the business initiatives, this will allow your social profile to capture the desired audience. In many instances, this identification and establishment of developing a professional online profile can often be established through experienced professionals.

Once your online brand has been established, it is time to portray who you are and consistently focus on your futuristic career goals and what you set to accomplish as an executive leader.

 

Recruitment of Candidates

 

When trying to recruit a new candidate, it is essential to have a plan set in place to effectively and efficiently fill the position.

To begin, define the position. While this sounds like a simple task, it is the most important as it identifies the needed skills and interests of the candidate pool. A needs assessment should be completed to understand the extent of what this position will be intended for. While some believe this is only done for a new position, existing roles should be assessed in the same manner to avoid complacency and focus on the betterment and continual growth of the organization.

The next step should be to write and post the job opening. While writing the job description, include the skills and expectations for the role that was discovered when defining what the position was. This description should go deeper than just recruitment. It should be an evaluative measure of potential candidates, a tool for managers to set expectations and a continuous performance review standard. When posting the job description, ensure the platform used correctly markets the type of company that is asking for hirees.

This leads to the development of the recruitment plan and how recruitment of a potential hire pool should be handled. First, informing internal members of the team should occur. This allows for interested candidates who are already privy to the company and possibly the open position to apply if interested. Current employees are also a great source for referrals either internally or externally. Next, the position should be distributed within your network. The message can be spread to individuals who are interested in making a transition, may know someone interested or can help disseminate the opening to their network as well. Finally, the job opening should be shared externally. It is most affordable and effective to post online but don’t be afraid to reach out to colleagues who have had similar openings to see how they found success.

The final step to recruiting candidates is the screening process. This process is a way to assess each candidate using a set group of criteria identified when defining the position. Resume screening is a great way to see if a candidate has what the job needs on paper. To follow-up with the resume, interviews can either be conducted in person or through the phone or video chat. When using these methods, plan questions in advance that allow for candidates to identify the competencies that are needed for the job.

Once the position is filled or a candidate has been identified for hire, it is important to follow-up with those that were interviewed either through a letter, email, or a phone call. Remember, not all recruitment processes are ‘one size fits all,’ do what works best for your organization and the position you are trying to fill.

Employees, when is it time to walk away? Employers, do you see the signs?

At any moment in your life, knowing when to walk away is difficult. Whether it be a professional opportunity or current career path, recognizing the signs of when to continue on is not always apparent.

From both an employer and employee perspective, the understanding of betterment for the future may be clouded by current situations. Once employees begin to recognize a needed change, their production is also affected tasking employers to take notice and recognize the same signs.

A lack of passion is a key indicator that it is time to move on. While it is completely normal to feel a lack of purpose occasionally, a continuation of that feeling shows a sure sign that the current position is not right. This demeanor is noticeable by both employees and employers as it affects task outcome and workplace morale.

Recognizing an inability to advance professionally signals a time to move on. As an employer, the potential of all employees should be top of mind and, if an individual has reached their full efficacy, it is important to allow them to continue toward maximum growth and encourage forward progression. On the contrast, as an employee, if the main focus is continued advancement and that is no longer possible, recognizing how talents can be utilized elsewhere within the company will prove to be more beneficial in the long run.

If there is not significant growth being seen, other opportunities should be considered. Employees should continuously bring amelioration to their department and the organization. Whether it be through workplace culture, task production or leadership, an employee should positively impact and strengthen the workplace. Conversely, an organization should do the same for its employees by supporting their needs, encouraging their progress and compensating accordingly. If a position or workplace growth is stunted, it may be time to walk away.

Hiring Quality Talent

Believe it or not, identifying a quality hire goes beyond a stacked resume or great recommendations. In fact, there are actually measurable calculations associated with quality hires based off of the goals of the company filling the position.

Quality hires can be attributed to the use of performance-based objectives established during the hiring process. Rather than identifying surface level qualities that must be met in the recruitment stage, such as education level or experience, direct objectives for identified success should be highlighted with goals and expectations being the prime focus.

Rather than a bulleted list of duties, make the job compelling to begin the employee “buy-in” process. Turn the description into an impactful story allowing for any potential candidate to begin to see the impact they can make. This will help garner strong candidates, fully interested in what the position has to offer and how they can be of service.

Focus on the past rather than the present. If a new hire is able to equate their past experiences with one comparable to those listed in the performance-based job description, they will have increased motivation to continue that trend of success as they already possess the skills and accomplishments to do so.

It is important to evaluate the quality of the candidate, pre-hire and post-hire. Before the candidate is offered the position, focus on past accomplishments and understand how they can support overall goals and objectives. This same process should be used post-hire as well. Once the candidate is on the job, circle back to the interview process and the agreements that were reached and experiences that were mentioned – this will help categorize employees as quality hires or can pinpoint weaknesses that need to be addressed.

The Advantages of Job Shadowing

Having the opportunity to shadow senior leadership when beginning a career or transitioning to a new position provides countless benefits, specifically, the resources and skillsets that are available in a shortened timeframe. But, why choose shadowing versus another on-boarding system when welcoming a new employee?

Shadowing is most important when the position is best learned through seeing or doing. The new hire is able to take in a plethora of information that, if trained through a different method, might be overlooked or not mentioned. It provides a “hands-on” approach to a position that may require a “hands-on” mindset.

The ability to learn firsthand from leaders who have forged their own path to success is second to none. The time spent with senior employees opens to the door to understand the ins and outs of the company culture, fine-tune and continue to develop professionally, and gain expert insights into the business. Shadowing also expedites the on-boarding process as new hires begin to acquaint themselves with the business sooner.

Job shadowing provides a behind-the-curtain look at the expectations of job duties, key deliverables needed, and the interactions between coworkers and peers and coworkers and senior management. This provides an excellent chance for senior management to recognize if processes, job descriptions or culture needs to be restructured or reevaluated.

New Year, New Focus

With the new year right around the corner most people are focused on personal improvement, new goals or beginning new habits. But this year could be the year for you to take the time to make positive resolutions to refocus on career advancement.

In 2018, invest energy into choosing realistic goals that require going outside of your comfort zone and pushing the limits. Acquire a new skill that may fill a gap for lateral movement and seek to improve upon areas that need more attention. Putting yourself in the best possible position to achieve, puts you in control of the outcome.

Implement helpful tricks to organize your life, workspace and mindset. Start each day of the new year with a fresh mind by clearing out the clutter that life can sometimes bring and figuring out a way to keep yourself efficient and productive. Prioritize small moments of organization, whether it be through keeping a steady workout regime to clear your mind or ensuring that your desk is tidy at the end of the day.

Find balance. Health and happiness go hand-in-hand with achievement and hard work. When you believe in the work that you do and wake up enjoying the life you live, success will follow.

The Impact of a New Position

Creating a new position is, in most cases, associated with filling a need for a specific role that is lacking within the company’s current business model. What is often overlooked is the impact it has on employee morale and overall view of the business opportunities.

Whether it be an entry-level or C-suite position, the addition of an employee’s career progression heightens the outlook of the company as it shows strength, sustainability, and regard for growth in its employees. Investing in the company’s support system not only positively correlates with business success but, contributes to maintaining a stable and continued future.

By creating a new position, the culture of current employees shifts to recognize and appreciate the support their existing position will be backed by. This can allow for duties to be redistributed and focus to be reprioritized to maintain continuity and support of overall values for the organization.

On the other hand, the creation of an executive position highlights the ideals of continuous employee growth. With a new executive-level added, companies are able to show their investment in the employees, emphasizing a culture of sustainability. Not only will lower-level employees aim to advance towards new levels but, current top executives will be motivated to continue to learn and grow within the organization.

While adding a new position may fill a void in the company’s overall business structure, the impact that a new position holds for current and incoming employees is far greater than what meets the eye.

Attracting Out-Of-Town Talent

Skills, compatibility, and drive – these are a just a few characteristics companies seek in potential new hires; however, there could be other various factors which makes a candidate more favorable. For instance, geographic location plays a large role in determining the difference between a suitable candidate and the perfect candidate.

The key to successfully broadening the hiring search pool is to understand the work style and abilities of the prospective hire and communicating how the company is invested in their future.

In order to attract job-seekers from in and around the company’s geographic location, focus on the industry and economic environment of the company that the employee may relocate to. Does this transition provide the best path for success and growth?

Rather than looking at the qualifications of a job, it is important to understand how, outside of the corporate structure, this candidate can find success and be happy about the decision to move. Highlight the location of the company by sharing favorite parts of the city and why many have chosen to build a career there.

Continue to stay true to the company’s roots. Make the culture of the workplace a central part of the discussion. Focus on the people, values, and opportunity the company has found success with as those qualities are what will continue the cycle of achievement.