Tag: Job Satisfaction


Creating a Recruitment Talent Campaign

 

When trying to attract top talent, the vacant position must stand out amongst the clutter of other eligible opportunities. Establishing a talent recruitment campaign allows both employers and employees to actively align goals and interests in a cultivating way.

Setting clear and measurable goals can be a great start when creating any recruitment campaign. Asking questions like “How many people do we want this to reach?” or “By what margin do we want to increase our overall audience?” allows for quantifiable marks to be set and evaluated throughout the process. When objectives and the end goal is understood, it determines the success built before and achieved after recruitment.

Determining the audience should be the second part of the campaign. It is important to develop a unique communicative platform through company culture videos, social media promotions, evaluating and reviewing glass door reviews and provide community-related blog posts. This will allow prospective candidates to evaluate the value proposition of the company and be the center of any talent recruitment practice.

While those platforms should exhibit the culture, they should also integrate a call to action. A call to action clearly separates the recruiting pool from those that are curious and those that are serious. It should be visible on all facets of communication with potential employees and should be direct and explanatory – providing further insight or action to those that interact.

Talent campaigns are meant to be unique to the position or organization. While every business may be using the same platform to get their message across, influencing those platforms to align with the goals that were initially established will provide recruits with an understanding of what the company has to offer and how they will be part of the success, and significant contributions to the future of the organization.

Employees, when is it time to walk away? Employers, do you see the signs?

At any moment in your life, knowing when to walk away is difficult. Whether it be a professional opportunity or current career path, recognizing the signs of when to continue on is not always apparent.

From both an employer and employee perspective, the understanding of betterment for the future may be clouded by current situations. Once employees begin to recognize a needed change, their production is also affected tasking employers to take notice and recognize the same signs.

A lack of passion is a key indicator that it is time to move on. While it is completely normal to feel a lack of purpose occasionally, a continuation of that feeling shows a sure sign that the current position is not right. This demeanor is noticeable by both employees and employers as it affects task outcome and workplace morale.

Recognizing an inability to advance professionally signals a time to move on. As an employer, the potential of all employees should be top of mind and, if an individual has reached their full efficacy, it is important to allow them to continue toward maximum growth and encourage forward progression. On the contrast, as an employee, if the main focus is continued advancement and that is no longer possible, recognizing how talents can be utilized elsewhere within the company will prove to be more beneficial in the long run.

If there is not significant growth being seen, other opportunities should be considered. Employees should continuously bring amelioration to their department and the organization. Whether it be through workplace culture, task production or leadership, an employee should positively impact and strengthen the workplace. Conversely, an organization should do the same for its employees by supporting their needs, encouraging their progress and compensating accordingly. If a position or workplace growth is stunted, it may be time to walk away.

Employee Company Reviews – how important are they?

Employee reviews can reveal a lot about an organization. Do you know what your employee reviews say about your company?

Sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed provide direct employee feedback about companies which can either make or break the recruitment process. Scouting for talent, in most cases, has a direct connection to how a company is perceived by its employees. So, how can organizations stay on top of these reviews and use them to their advantage?

Turn the critical reviews into opportunity! It is best to dedicate the needed time to monitor your online brand and use this feedback to make a difference in the company’s culture. Knowing the honest, and sometimes, painful truth about how employees discern their time within the business can help strengthen the structure of the workplace.

The idea of transparency should not be something to shy away from either. Knowing the ins and outs of a certain position or department and the impression it holds both internally and externally, will give managers the ability to identify weaknesses, be pragmatic and fill in the gaps recognized by employees.

Transitioning to the C-Suite

The ascension to the C-Suite is often paired with redesigned goals and ideas to ensure success in the new role. Fostering a successful transition can bring challenges as aligning others around those specific objectives is not always an easy feat.

To combat these common struggles, it is best to establish a shared vision on company priorities. Aligning the organization to understand and believe in the strategic design of the organization is a critical component to build success when executives are promoted or have accepted  a senior role. By creating an environment where employees buy-in to the vision of the company, executives will work to establish an immediate and long-term impact in the foundation of the organization.

Accepting that the answers are not always clear, and can be a significant learning curve during any transition. Making quick and calculated moves to establish a trustworthy team allows for any executive to begin to influence others with designed support.

Taking all of this into account, nothing can be done without the thought and preparation of self-readiness. By designating the appropriate amount of time to a purposeful tenure, ascending into the C-Suite will be complimented with proven results.

Turning Over a New Leaf on Employee Turnover

The connotations associated with “employee turnover” are often negative. From lost costs to disruption in an organization, employee turnover does have significant risks that test the strength of a company and its structure.

What is often overlooked is the benefit that employee turnover may bring to the organization.

Zappos, an online shoe and clothing store, has been widely praised for its mindset surrounding employee satisfaction. In 2015, the company began offering its employees exit payments, an incentive given to those who were interested in the company but decided it was not a right fit for them. This incentive lead to approximately 14% of employees accepting the offer.

While some turnover is encouraged, the importance of organizational agility is two-fold. The ability for employees to manage their employment satisfaction translates into greater success, for those who stay with the company have a mindset committed to the company’s growth and future.  Wiith the possibility of sporadic, unplanned position vacancies, positioning the business model to react and absorb any negative repercussions takes time, commitment and understanding.

It is crucial to create a culture that recognizes employee turnover is not always negative but rather something that can offer a positive shift in skills, mindsets, and motivations for the workforce, ultimately lending to the success of an agile and proactive company.

Mastering performance reviews

Performance reviews – a historically dreaded time in the office. Understanding how to take advantage of the review process and what personal and organizational improvements can be made will help both managers and employees alike to develop as an employee and contribute more to the company.

Meetings between manager and employee allows for the construction of individualized plans geared toward success. Not only do these conversations open a clear line of communication and transparency but they align company and employee goals and strategy. Setting goals that are smart, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely (S.M.A.R.T.) allows employees to prioritize their work in the coming months based on personal and company goals.

And while performance reviews provide managers and employees the chance to speak openly about position performance, no review should come as a surprise. Employees should be aware of their strengths and weaknesses beforehand allowing the time allotted for a performance review to be focused on goals to improve or further success. The categories that are being evaluated must be clearly outlined to establish a clear line of expectations.

After the performance review, managers should take the time to review their notes that were taken during the meeting. Rather than stuffing the file into a folder and storing until the next performance review comes up, taking the time to map out a timeline of the milestones that the employee must hit to be considered successful is important to continue departmental success. This practice will not only provide managers the ability to map out their expectations, but it will also provide an insight into practices within the office that may require more focus.

One-on-one reviews are great to establish relationships between managers and employees; however, creating a system that allows the department to anonymously submit general feedback and personal role evaluation allows the opportunity for staff to identify micro-level needs regarding professional development.

Coaching and Development Replaces Performance Management

Twenty years ago, if you asked any employee how they were evaluated in their job, they would most likely say through employee performance ratings – a system designed to rank the performance of employees against colleagues strictly measured through output. Today, companies are turning towards a new regime of employee performance ratings – a system based on skills and attitude with the ability to drive change.

Managers who provide regular feedback and opportunities for growth and improvement are far more likely to have high-performers and greater employee satisfaction responses. The focus on coaching and development is becoming a priority in the workforce as more and more executives have found significant links to overall business success.

Now managers must dedicate time managing and communicating the importance of performance ownership with their direct reports. Coaching requires an open mindset, willing to build and progress rather than evaluate. Most importantly, managers must recognize the complete separation between performance and employee compensation.

A shift towards this progressive movement starts with senior leaders acknowledging the need to use performance management as a way to build skills. Managers need to be taught to provide valuable feedback that encourages their employees to further excel in their role.

Communicating expectations in an interview

Many times, to attain top candidates, job expectations and job realities do not always coincide. Significant responsibility is placed on the company to set realistic expectations from day one, so the possibility of a future dissatisfied employee is lessened.

Setting job responsibilities needs to be the priority. While responsibilities may vary, providing a framework of what to expect from day to day will give the candidate a better understanding of what they will be doing. This is an excellent opportunity for management to identify specific job duties to decrease the possibility of task overlap, making for a better operating workplace.

With the changing work place culture, in many cases, the expectations for business hours vary from position to position. However, it is important to alleviate the frustrations of either working too much or too little than what is expected by outlining specific office hour expectations. Finding an employee who is unwilling to work more than 40 hours may be detrimental to the success of them in that position; it is better to outline those expectations sooner than later.

An expectation for company culture should be drawn out before making a hire as well. If extracurricular office activities are a large part of the social side of the business, the candidate should know that they may be asked to participate in them. The social aspect of a company plays a significant role in employee satisfaction, and it would be advantageous to promote culture the right away to understand if the candidate will be a good fit.

 

The Power of Employee Referrals

Tapping into the tremendous advantage of employee referrals can ultimately translate into a successful hire, yielding high results in the long run.

Job seekers first go to their network for potential job leads. Keeping current employees in the loop allows them the opportunity to actively search for someone that would be a good fit for the open position. This is also advantageous when searching for a specialized role as the employee may have referrals outside of the particular job industry.

Time is money and hiring a referred candidate requires less money and time than a traditional candidate. The process and costs of creating a job post, waiting for applicable resumes and scanning for potential hires are tedious and can lead to potentially poor results. However, only an interview is needed for a referred candidate.

Having a familiar contact in the business will also make the onboarding process a lot faster. The advantage of having someone the new candidate can trust and turn to with questions will allow them to acclimate to the culture a lot faster than others who need time to adjust and find their peer confidant.

Both the referred candidate and employee who successfully referred the candidate will be more inclined to stay in their respective positions longer. Because there is pressure on the achievement of a referred candidate for the current employee, the quality of referrals is greater than those found through traditional means. Once the referred candidate is successfully brought on, the current employee feels better with a greater sense of trust for the organization since they are a part of the company’s growing future.

While employee referrals remain to be one of the most successful ways to hire, it is not a system that can be based on just word-of-mouth communication. A specific process must be established for employees or external connections to provide candidate leads. Ask for referrals and leave the door open for potentials – while you may not be currently hiring, it’s nice to continuously add to the talent pipeline.

Appealing to Passive Candidates

Active versus passive candidates seem to be a constant topic of discussion. Whether the applicant is actively pursuing a position or has passively encountered the organization, it is important to maintain an active line of external communication to display the culture of the company and cultivate a high level of interest with the candidate.

According to a 2017 examination, 89% of people within the workforce are either somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs. However, in December of 2016, a survey by CareerBuilder.com reported that “more than one in five workers (22 percent) are planning to change jobs in 2017.”

These “planners,” or passive candidates, are considered to be desirable because they are content with where they are. There is less competition when speaking with these candidates because they are not actively searching and the candidates are more inclined to speak truthfully since there is no pressure of a job. So, how can you position yourself to appeal to active job seekers but still engage with the passive candidates?

Keep up with social media! This is an ever-changing but entirely influential area of business that needs to be at the top of the list when it comes to finding the right candidate. A great post can instantly be shared by others and can reach a large amount of people. Social media fosters a way to build relationships and communicate in an informal way that is reflective of the culture that the company will bring.

Create a talent pipeline. Develop and maintain a list of potential candidates who may, either today or in the future, be in search of a position within the company to allow a pipeline of passive candidates in the event a position becomes available, it is easy to reach out and sell the opportunity that would position them for advancement.

Companies must always encourage employee referrals. This should be a primary source for candidate searches since most active or semi-active job seekers reach out to their friends first to seek job leads. This recruitment method allows employees to actively speak on behalf of the company, creating the opportunity for great and reliable candidate engagement.

Consider the candidate’s experience. Design an employee application and interview process that works with all types of candidates. It is important to continue the efficiency of the interview process in order to secure the best candidate for the job.