Tag: Positivity


How Giving Back Influences The Bottom Line

The holiday spirit is in the air, with businesses focusing on how they can give back to the community. While acts of gratitude positively affect personal health and happiness, there is also a strong correlation between charitable giving and boosting the bottom line.

By focusing on an impactful community cause, companies are able to connect on a deeper level with customers, partners and employees who share the same values to make a difference, opening the door for new and meaningful business ventures to arise beyond just the holiday season.

Beyond the public relations advantage that the spirit of giving provides, tax advantages also affect the bottom line. With a certain amount donated, organizations are able to claim a charitable deduction offering businesses the opportunity to give back with money not being a major deterrent to do so.

Taking a few moments out of the work day to volunteer at a local food bank or donate time to deliver presents to less fortunate children increases company visibility within the community and provides employees a unique insight into the culture that the organization was built on.

Giving of time and financial support to those in need is a simple and easy reminder to be grateful. When given the chance, employees develop a sense of accomplishment for their service and appreciation for the position they are in and the company providing the opportunity. Morale increases and the desire to work hard for a company that believes in helping those in need grows a bit stronger.

Never Under Estimate Your Value!

Confidence within the workplace is key to a successful career, and a portion of such confidence is the power that comes with knowing ones true value. Social interactions, energy and attitude play a major part in how people interact with one another in the workplace. Positive interactions are driven by value-led thoughts.

Believing that you have what it takes to make a powerful impact in your role and not accepting less than what is deserved solidifies the understanding of your self-worth. Have the confidence to say what you want because you know it is earned but also, have the humility to realize unrealistic expectations.

Evaluate who you are and who you want to be, while celebrating your accomplishments. Prioritizing your commitments and personally valuing who you are will translate into value in any situation.

Coaching and Development Replaces Performance Management

Twenty years ago, if you asked any employee how they were evaluated in their job, they would most likely say through employee performance ratings – a system designed to rank the performance of employees against colleagues strictly measured through output. Today, companies are turning towards a new regime of employee performance ratings – a system based on skills and attitude with the ability to drive change.

Managers who provide regular feedback and opportunities for growth and improvement are far more likely to have high-performers and greater employee satisfaction responses. The focus on coaching and development is becoming a priority in the workforce as more and more executives have found significant links to overall business success.

Now managers must dedicate time managing and communicating the importance of performance ownership with their direct reports. Coaching requires an open mindset, willing to build and progress rather than evaluate. Most importantly, managers must recognize the complete separation between performance and employee compensation.

A shift towards this progressive movement starts with senior leaders acknowledging the need to use performance management as a way to build skills. Managers need to be taught to provide valuable feedback that encourages their employees to further excel in their role.

Communicating expectations in an interview

Many times, to attain top candidates, job expectations and job realities do not always coincide. Significant responsibility is placed on the company to set realistic expectations from day one, so the possibility of a future dissatisfied employee is lessened.

Setting job responsibilities needs to be the priority. While responsibilities may vary, providing a framework of what to expect from day to day will give the candidate a better understanding of what they will be doing. This is an excellent opportunity for management to identify specific job duties to decrease the possibility of task overlap, making for a better operating workplace.

With the changing work place culture, in many cases, the expectations for business hours vary from position to position. However, it is important to alleviate the frustrations of either working too much or too little than what is expected by outlining specific office hour expectations. Finding an employee who is unwilling to work more than 40 hours may be detrimental to the success of them in that position; it is better to outline those expectations sooner than later.

An expectation for company culture should be drawn out before making a hire as well. If extracurricular office activities are a large part of the social side of the business, the candidate should know that they may be asked to participate in them. The social aspect of a company plays a significant role in employee satisfaction, and it would be advantageous to promote culture the right away to understand if the candidate will be a good fit.

 

The Power of Employee Referrals

Tapping into the tremendous advantage of employee referrals can ultimately translate into a successful hire, yielding high results in the long run.

Job seekers first go to their network for potential job leads. Keeping current employees in the loop allows them the opportunity to actively search for someone that would be a good fit for the open position. This is also advantageous when searching for a specialized role as the employee may have referrals outside of the particular job industry.

Time is money and hiring a referred candidate requires less money and time than a traditional candidate. The process and costs of creating a job post, waiting for applicable resumes and scanning for potential hires are tedious and can lead to potentially poor results. However, only an interview is needed for a referred candidate.

Having a familiar contact in the business will also make the onboarding process a lot faster. The advantage of having someone the new candidate can trust and turn to with questions will allow them to acclimate to the culture a lot faster than others who need time to adjust and find their peer confidant.

Both the referred candidate and employee who successfully referred the candidate will be more inclined to stay in their respective positions longer. Because there is pressure on the achievement of a referred candidate for the current employee, the quality of referrals is greater than those found through traditional means. Once the referred candidate is successfully brought on, the current employee feels better with a greater sense of trust for the organization since they are a part of the company’s growing future.

While employee referrals remain to be one of the most successful ways to hire, it is not a system that can be based on just word-of-mouth communication. A specific process must be established for employees or external connections to provide candidate leads. Ask for referrals and leave the door open for potentials – while you may not be currently hiring, it’s nice to continuously add to the talent pipeline.

Make a Difference

Working hard is only part of the equation. Time, dedication, loyalty, trust and various other qualities complete the workplace culture and overall job satisfaction. First, ask yourself a few questions: How can you step outside of the status quo? How can you make a difference in your company?

Begin with observation. Be open and receptive to changes and other viewpoints which will encourage the same from your employees. Learn and observe how the people you manage complete various tasks. If the there is an easier more efficient way, teach them. Once the culture of the company is established as a growing team rather than individual entities, the company will begin to benefit.

Be the energy you want to see. Encourage others and enlighten them through your positivity. As you walk into the office, smile and engage with your employees in an upbeat, personable way. Acknowledge a job well done and spark creativity. Others will begin to imitate the positive example you set making for an enjoyable workplace setting.

It is important to reach outside of your company walls as a team. Volunteer and be a member of your community. By doing so, it will help build your business relations and increase motivation and dedication to the firm. Helping others creates a sense of purpose, and if your company offers that sense of purpose, employees will be happier with the work they do in the office.

Accepting Feedback in an Executive Role

As senior executives move up the ranks, their skills and talents become solidified, making them more efficient in their job and less prone to receiving feedback.

While top executives may welcome criticism, most may not want to accept constructive feedback based upon their position or the level within the organization.

It is important to instill a constructive and creative way for top executives to receive feedback due to the success factors that can be reached within all levels of the organization managing at a high level.

Executives must be open to building relationships with subordinates and cultivating a culture built on strong, open communication. By doing so, employees at all levels will begin to integrate, openness into their work tasks with peers leading to ultimate success for projects and outward facing materials. Not only will employee trust be strengthened, but the entire culture of the organization will also thrive as both management and subordinates can actively engage in constructive communication and improvements.

Think of the organization as a blank slate. If the company was rebuilt today, what features of the current company would be brought into the new business? What features would be left behind? What employees would be brought in? What employees would not pass the interview process? By having top-level management take the time to examine these questions and intuitively look at the success and failures of the company, recommendations and a new path for implementation will become more evident. By creating an environment of feedback and coaching, it will provide a fresh outlook on the company processes while still allowing the executive accept feedback in an alternative way.

A working culture

Often, a company’s culture molds the success of employees and can ultimately have one of the largest impacts on job satisfaction and low turnover rates. A culture fit is one of the key traits assessed when hiring an individual. Before determining if a candidate adapts well into the company’s culture, it is best to understand the values, attributes, and goals the organization values most, and then translating those ideas into a successful interview and hiring process.

When defining these traits, it is best to articulate a comprehensive message across all departments within the organization. It’s recommended to identify and characterize the culture in a way that can be recognized by everyone in the organization and will translate to hiring success throughout the business.

While defining the traits of the organization is helpful in identifying characteristics in potential recruits; real-time exposure to the culture of the company allows for the candidate to become engaged and attain insight on the overall organization.  By giving potential employees a tour of the office and allowing them to observe how different departments interact with one another, it will not only enable you to note their comfort level and adaptability to the office space but it will give them the sense of belonging, and when hired, make for a smooth transition into the company. The candidate who shares the same values and fits well with the organization will be easily noticeable, making the selection process an easy decision for the hiring manager.

By internally assessing the cultural of the organization followed by displaying the culture through the recruiting process, the success of the hired individuals will ultimately drive growth, promote positive outcomes and bring success to the organization.

Blossom with JSpire

JSpire was created with love and passion for helping others.  Compelled to make a difference in the recruiting business, Janice Shisler, Founder/Principal of JSpire Recruiting, created a brand that focuses on making an exceptional recruitment experience for the candidate while successfully blending them with the Company’s expectations.

JSpire collaboratively advises and supports the client companies and candidates by connecting the right company with the right candidate.  The creation of the LifeWork Solution has become an excellent model for our recruitment business. Janice approaches the LifeWork solution with the idea that “Companies want people who are committed to the opportunity and who love the city. Most candidates are looking for a career transition, an improved work/life balance, or simply looking for a better opportunity. Rather than finding a candidate and placing them into a role that might be a fit, we look for the best LifeWork Solution for both the client company and candidate.”

With every placement, JSpire focuses on every aspect of the hiring process ensuring the recruitment process is customized for each client company, while making a personalized connection with the candidates.

“We want people to feel good about the company they are going to work for, but we also want the company to feel engaged and part of the recruitment process,” Janice explains. “This is what distinguishes JSpire. JSpire’s true philosophy is People Blossom and Companies Flourish.”

Not only has Janice created a legacy in the world of executive recruiting, she has created a company based on a culture of hard work and success that you can trust and appreciate.

Executing Success

Every industry has found success in one way or another through individual processes and protocols. But how does one go about bringing in an entirely new executive with a different mindset, ideas, and work value construct while still maintaining a strong atmosphere?

Most importantly, get a head start and begin creating a list of expectations of the work that needs to be done. Prepare for a winning mindset by having a plan in place that will properly onboard any new executive or employee. Take advantage of the first 100 days of the job by relying on an action plan that integrates the mission and vision for the company.

Communicate with the new hire. While there may be a lot of information to give and for the executive to retain, stress the importance and the goal of the successful atmosphere that has been built. If you are unable to communicate the desires for the position, when something does occur, a rushed reaction may result, leading to chaos. Plan out what needs to be completed and effectively communicate the goals.

Build a team centered on success. Identify key members that will be an asset to the role and allow them to grow, learn and evolve with the new executive hire. A team built on trust and compatibility has all of the makings to continue a successful pattern of business. The most effective practices come from a collaborative team environment to ensure the companies strategic and operational initiatives are met with a successful team!