Tag: Process


Creating a Recruitment Talent Campaign

 

When trying to attract top talent, the vacant position must stand out amongst the clutter of other eligible opportunities. Establishing a talent recruitment campaign allows both employers and employees to actively align goals and interests in a cultivating way.

Setting clear and measurable goals can be a great start when creating any recruitment campaign. Asking questions like “How many people do we want this to reach?” or “By what margin do we want to increase our overall audience?” allows for quantifiable marks to be set and evaluated throughout the process. When objectives and the end goal is understood, it determines the success built before and achieved after recruitment.

Determining the audience should be the second part of the campaign. It is important to develop a unique communicative platform through company culture videos, social media promotions, evaluating and reviewing glass door reviews and provide community-related blog posts. This will allow prospective candidates to evaluate the value proposition of the company and be the center of any talent recruitment practice.

While those platforms should exhibit the culture, they should also integrate a call to action. A call to action clearly separates the recruiting pool from those that are curious and those that are serious. It should be visible on all facets of communication with potential employees and should be direct and explanatory – providing further insight or action to those that interact.

Talent campaigns are meant to be unique to the position or organization. While every business may be using the same platform to get their message across, influencing those platforms to align with the goals that were initially established will provide recruits with an understanding of what the company has to offer and how they will be part of the success, and significant contributions to the future of the organization.

Should Succession Planning be on your Company Agenda?

As the structure of an organization matures and employees begin to mature and transition from their initial roles, succession planning becomes a key piece in ensuring the organization will continue to run smoothly.

Be proactive in outlining a succession plan that works best for the culture of the company. Set aside adequate time to identify the key traits needed for another leader to fill the soon-to-be vacant position. Even if a transition is not expected immediately, proper timing and planning make a difference in the midst of any occupational shift.

In the spirit of timing, this offers an excellent opportunity to provide training to other employees that may be interested in leadership roles down the road or perform trail runs for potential candidates whom may be closer to the level of accepting more responsibility. Opening up the chance for employees to actively seek leadership roles and identifying top performers, organizations pave a greater road towards smoother transitions.

Through training and vetting, it is important to relay the shared vision of the organization. Engaging in transparent strategic conversations will not only help develop a greater vision for future success inter-departmentally but it will also magnify the strengths of top-performers.

Once an internal succession structure is identified, the process should be mirrored and appropriately transitioned to fit the hiring strategy, establishing the traits valued in top-leadership parallels that of new additions.

How to Properly Resign as an Executive

After deciding to forge a new career path, resigning from the current position is naturally one of the next steps. As an executive, the utmost importance falls on how their departure transpires and how it affects the company in the long haul.

Appropriate transparency and confidence will define how any executive leaves their current role. Naturally, as a leader departs, followers begin to raise suspicion. Being confident in the transition without making vague excuses will alleviate that worrisome feeling that may arise in employees. The reasoning behind such change should be professional and future-centric rather than focused on the specific instances that led to the transition.

An in-person announcement to the organization is the best way to break news for any leave. Falling in line with transparency, this method allows current employees the chance to ask questions, witness organizational support and positivity and, most importantly, observe the raw emotion that is paired with any goodbye. No matter the circumstances, good or bad, executives will be able to better gauge the reaction of their team and quash any potential rumors or “this is what I heard” scenarios.

Leaving the company in good standing should be at the forefront of any executive’s mind after deciding to depart from their current role. While two weeks’ notice may be the norm, more time may be needed to ensure adequate measures and plans are in place to set the company up for future success. Whether it be two weeks or two months, a proper go-ahead plan should be established and communicated to support the company that such executive was once a part of.

Is your company brand more than just a logo?

In today’s society, attention is critical for success. If a company is unable to grasp and maintain the attention of customers, there is significant risk in getting lost in the mix of a hundred other businesses designed to provide their necessary services. The importance behind building a relationship beyond the brand name should be at the forefront of a company’s business model.

To go beyond a title and design on the company letterhead, there must be support, guidance and belief to push towards overall success. A company should be recognized by what it can provide both internally to its employees and externally to the community.

Offering the opportunity for employees to “buy in” to the process and ultimately, the success of the brand will translate to customers buying in as well. When employees are satisfied with the organization they are a part of and its values, it is much easier to attract customers who are satisfied with what the company offers as well. Employee benefits, incentives, and recognition opens the door for employees to create a cycle of positivity as they begin to recognize the support given, appreciate the opportunity and project the company values into customers.

Externally, standing out to your customers should also be more than the obvious. It should be supported through interactions, consistency, availability and appreciation. Having a brand that guarantees pleasant interactions, consistently provides a satisfactory product and/or experience, goes beyond the status quo. Acknowledging the dedication of loyal customers is guaranteed to maintain consumer share of mind.

While other companies offer the same products and services, going above and beyond for both customers and employees, will help the company become a brand, distinguishing itself from the competition and paving the way toward a tenured future.

Through the looking glass: prospecting a client through a different lens

The process to recruit a new hire must be able to accurately gauge their potential success based on the objectives of the company and the available position, whether it be through an in-person, phone or video interview. This can be achieved through either a two or five-step process.

The use of a two-step recruitment process is quick and simple. Screening the resume followed by an in-person interview is the best way to find a suitable candidate in the least amount of time since it requires little back and forth between the organization and potential employee. Two-step hiring also allows for a candidate’s on-boarding process to be streamlined in a time-efficient manner.

This type of recruitment process is best suited for quick hiring needs and helps distinguish warm versus hot leads. However, this process lacks the substance required to properly vet a large pool of seemingly quality recruits since the speed of hiring for an open position poses threats of under-qualified applicants.

In contrast, the five-step hiring system begins with a resume screen and is followed by a phone interview, video interview, in-person interview and finishes with on-the-job skill testing. This process is best used for positions that require deeper skillsets than average, allowing for interviewees to highlight their abilities over a lengthened period of time.

The five-step system is also ideal for positions with large applicant pools as each step in the hiring process will naturally separate top candidates from average candidates and grants hiring managers the time needed to properly evaluate a candidate’s potential and organizational fit. While this process allows for an in-depth evaluation of a future employee, it can be deemed too lengthy, causing candidates to lose interest and abandon the hiring process all together.

Not all hiring methods are the same, choose one that works best for the organization that will set you apart from your competition.