Tag: Work


Targeting End of the Year Priorities

It’s hard to believe that 2017 is already almost halfway done. Now, comes the time to take a look back and reflect on the goals set out at the beginning of the year and realign your priorities focus on your goals for the remainder of the year and finish strong!

While it may sound tedious, the number one priority for a leader approaching the second half of the year is building upon employee engagement and satisfaction. Satisfying existing employees will decrease the need for new talent acquisition. Engaged employees are happy employees, and those employees contribute positively to the overall success of the company. Defining career development initiatives and actively listening to concerns allows for employees to feel as if they can make a difference and impact on the organization.

As with every industry, new technology continues to shape the way organizations conduct business, impacting systems, processes, and people. And as much as some people may be trying to avoid the technological boom, the digital age is here to stay. It is important to keep up with technical innovation and develop strategies that advance the company to competitive heights. Innovative processes and new business models may need to be developed to support the movement. However, such implementations will lead to great success in the long run and will set you apart from other traditional companies.

None of these priorities are possible without satisfied employees that embrace the vision and strategy for the organization. Recruitment and retention should be a top priority leading into the second half of 2017. Think about establishing a formal recruitment strategy and hiring the talent of the future. This will significantly impact your organizational culture and create future success.

Coaching and Development Replaces Performance Management

Twenty years ago, if you asked any employee how they were evaluated in their job, they would most likely say through employee performance ratings – a system designed to rank the performance of employees against colleagues strictly measured through output. Today, companies are turning towards a new regime of employee performance ratings – a system based on skills and attitude with the ability to drive change.

Managers who provide regular feedback and opportunities for growth and improvement are far more likely to have high-performers and greater employee satisfaction responses. The focus on coaching and development is becoming a priority in the workforce as more and more executives have found significant links to overall business success.

Now managers must dedicate time managing and communicating the importance of performance ownership with their direct reports. Coaching requires an open mindset, willing to build and progress rather than evaluate. Most importantly, managers must recognize the complete separation between performance and employee compensation.

A shift towards this progressive movement starts with senior leaders acknowledging the need to use performance management as a way to build skills. Managers need to be taught to provide valuable feedback that encourages their employees to further excel in their role.

Compensation Budgeting

Budgeting is always a hot topic when it comes to employee benefits, which can sometimes lead to recruiters feeling as if their budget is stretched too thin to cover everything that is wanted in the workplace. But, it doesn’t need to be like that – here are some simple tricks to making the most out of a tight budget:

  • Offer competitive non-salary benefits. Make up for a lack of monetary incentives with benefits catered towards the employee’s needs. Offering childcare support, flexible schedules, office space, remote working opportunities and other chances for employees to feel valued is a great alternative that does not require salary-impacted benefits – rather, focus on employee work-life balance.
  • Focus on what’s important. There are items that can be considered “must-haves” that will make a huge difference in the day-to-day work life. Prioritizing items that are “must-haves” versus the “nice-to-haves.” Do this by ensuring the expenses are worth every penny.
  • Forecast – it’s vital to a healthy workplace budget. Keep in mind that staffing will change in the next year whether you see it coming or not. It is important to plan for these changes and leave a bit of budgetary room available to account for those changes, especially considering employee compensation.
  • Understand that you will not always be right. Whatever compensation package is offered, it is never going to be the best thing for every employee, and that is okay. Realize the biggest factors that will lead to company and employee success. One of the best ways to show appreciation for employees is fair compensation, so focus your attention on the benefits that will make the biggest impact for the largest number of employees.

 

Communicating expectations in an interview

Many times, to attain top candidates, job expectations and job realities do not always coincide. Significant responsibility is placed on the company to set realistic expectations from day one, so the possibility of a future dissatisfied employee is lessened.

Setting job responsibilities needs to be the priority. While responsibilities may vary, providing a framework of what to expect from day to day will give the candidate a better understanding of what they will be doing. This is an excellent opportunity for management to identify specific job duties to decrease the possibility of task overlap, making for a better operating workplace.

With the changing work place culture, in many cases, the expectations for business hours vary from position to position. However, it is important to alleviate the frustrations of either working too much or too little than what is expected by outlining specific office hour expectations. Finding an employee who is unwilling to work more than 40 hours may be detrimental to the success of them in that position; it is better to outline those expectations sooner than later.

An expectation for company culture should be drawn out before making a hire as well. If extracurricular office activities are a large part of the social side of the business, the candidate should know that they may be asked to participate in them. The social aspect of a company plays a significant role in employee satisfaction, and it would be advantageous to promote culture the right away to understand if the candidate will be a good fit.

 

Appealing to Passive Candidates

Active versus passive candidates seem to be a constant topic of discussion. Whether the applicant is actively pursuing a position or has passively encountered the organization, it is important to maintain an active line of external communication to display the culture of the company and cultivate a high level of interest with the candidate.

According to a 2017 examination, 89% of people within the workforce are either somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs. However, in December of 2016, a survey by CareerBuilder.com reported that “more than one in five workers (22 percent) are planning to change jobs in 2017.”

These “planners,” or passive candidates, are considered to be desirable because they are content with where they are. There is less competition when speaking with these candidates because they are not actively searching and the candidates are more inclined to speak truthfully since there is no pressure of a job. So, how can you position yourself to appeal to active job seekers but still engage with the passive candidates?

Keep up with social media! This is an ever-changing but entirely influential area of business that needs to be at the top of the list when it comes to finding the right candidate. A great post can instantly be shared by others and can reach a large amount of people. Social media fosters a way to build relationships and communicate in an informal way that is reflective of the culture that the company will bring.

Create a talent pipeline. Develop and maintain a list of potential candidates who may, either today or in the future, be in search of a position within the company to allow a pipeline of passive candidates in the event a position becomes available, it is easy to reach out and sell the opportunity that would position them for advancement.

Companies must always encourage employee referrals. This should be a primary source for candidate searches since most active or semi-active job seekers reach out to their friends first to seek job leads. This recruitment method allows employees to actively speak on behalf of the company, creating the opportunity for great and reliable candidate engagement.

Consider the candidate’s experience. Design an employee application and interview process that works with all types of candidates. It is important to continue the efficiency of the interview process in order to secure the best candidate for the job.

Accepting Feedback in an Executive Role

As senior executives move up the ranks, their skills and talents become solidified, making them more efficient in their job and less prone to receiving feedback.

While top executives may welcome criticism, most may not want to accept constructive feedback based upon their position or the level within the organization.

It is important to instill a constructive and creative way for top executives to receive feedback due to the success factors that can be reached within all levels of the organization managing at a high level.

Executives must be open to building relationships with subordinates and cultivating a culture built on strong, open communication. By doing so, employees at all levels will begin to integrate, openness into their work tasks with peers leading to ultimate success for projects and outward facing materials. Not only will employee trust be strengthened, but the entire culture of the organization will also thrive as both management and subordinates can actively engage in constructive communication and improvements.

Think of the organization as a blank slate. If the company was rebuilt today, what features of the current company would be brought into the new business? What features would be left behind? What employees would be brought in? What employees would not pass the interview process? By having top-level management take the time to examine these questions and intuitively look at the success and failures of the company, recommendations and a new path for implementation will become more evident. By creating an environment of feedback and coaching, it will provide a fresh outlook on the company processes while still allowing the executive accept feedback in an alternative way.

The Key to Great Leadership

Becoming a great leader comes with hard work and various levels of dedication. While it may not be an easy path, the end of the road to success will be met with the both personal and organizational achievements.

Lead by example. Let others know how you want office practices to be run by being the first to fall in line. Set the tone and allow others to follow. This will allow for employees to begin to trust you as a leader and believe that you mean what you say. Not only will this help improve the general workings of the business, it will also improve the workplace culture.

Effectively communicate. Don’t speak to be heard, but rather, speak to be understood. Take time out of your day and listen to your most valuable asset,  your employees. The openness and willing to hear what they have to say will help facilitate an open dialogue. Ensure you properly communicate so that company downfalls and achievements are easily heard, understood and acted on. It is important to shorten non-imperative messages so when a time-consuming message arises, employees take the importance seriously.

Learn from the past leaders. Think about how successful the company is currently and what can be changed to grow with greater success. Incorporate the achievements of leaders into the current culture. Inspire those around you by implementing proven practices and discovering new ways to help the organization grow so you can leave a legacy behind.

Continually learning and enhancing your knowledge will provide you with new ideas that can complement your vision and ideas to your organization. Whether it be from an employee, colleague or superior, there is always a lesson to be learned that can be taken with you throughout your life. Open your mind to new avenues of success and possibilities. Great leaders never stop learning and create success stories.

A working culture

Often, a company’s culture molds the success of employees and can ultimately have one of the largest impacts on job satisfaction and low turnover rates. A culture fit is one of the key traits assessed when hiring an individual. Before determining if a candidate adapts well into the company’s culture, it is best to understand the values, attributes, and goals the organization values most, and then translating those ideas into a successful interview and hiring process.

When defining these traits, it is best to articulate a comprehensive message across all departments within the organization. It’s recommended to identify and characterize the culture in a way that can be recognized by everyone in the organization and will translate to hiring success throughout the business.

While defining the traits of the organization is helpful in identifying characteristics in potential recruits; real-time exposure to the culture of the company allows for the candidate to become engaged and attain insight on the overall organization.  By giving potential employees a tour of the office and allowing them to observe how different departments interact with one another, it will not only enable you to note their comfort level and adaptability to the office space but it will give them the sense of belonging, and when hired, make for a smooth transition into the company. The candidate who shares the same values and fits well with the organization will be easily noticeable, making the selection process an easy decision for the hiring manager.

By internally assessing the cultural of the organization followed by displaying the culture through the recruiting process, the success of the hired individuals will ultimately drive growth, promote positive outcomes and bring success to the organization.

Blossom with JSpire

JSpire was created with love and passion for helping others.  Compelled to make a difference in the recruiting business, Janice Shisler, Founder/Principal of JSpire Recruiting, created a brand that focuses on making an exceptional recruitment experience for the candidate while successfully blending them with the Company’s expectations.

JSpire collaboratively advises and supports the client companies and candidates by connecting the right company with the right candidate.  The creation of the LifeWork Solution has become an excellent model for our recruitment business. Janice approaches the LifeWork solution with the idea that “Companies want people who are committed to the opportunity and who love the city. Most candidates are looking for a career transition, an improved work/life balance, or simply looking for a better opportunity. Rather than finding a candidate and placing them into a role that might be a fit, we look for the best LifeWork Solution for both the client company and candidate.”

With every placement, JSpire focuses on every aspect of the hiring process ensuring the recruitment process is customized for each client company, while making a personalized connection with the candidates.

“We want people to feel good about the company they are going to work for, but we also want the company to feel engaged and part of the recruitment process,” Janice explains. “This is what distinguishes JSpire. JSpire’s true philosophy is People Blossom and Companies Flourish.”

Not only has Janice created a legacy in the world of executive recruiting, she has created a company based on a culture of hard work and success that you can trust and appreciate.

Fall in love with your job (Again)

Love is in the air. But, that love may not be felt as much as it should if you don’t love the job you are in. So, how can you rekindle that old flame you once had?

To begin, step back. Take time to reflect on what excited you about your job and focus on your priorities. Think about your life and how you wish to live it.

Once you have taken the time to reflect and prioritize, go out and get what you want. Don’t assume people know what you want or what you are thinking. Express yourself in a productive way that points to what will be conducive to your happiness and the overall production of your work.

Plan out time to do the work you love. Everyone has priorities and everyday duties but by making time for the work that first brought you into your position, your love for your work will grow, and the aggravation that is associated with doing the tasks that you may not like to do will lessen with time.

Change your surroundings. Adjust your office, work in different environments and volunteer for new projects that may give you a different perspective and allow you the opportunity to learn something new. Find avenues that you can step outside of the everyday work routine and provide you with a peace of mind that will set you up for success.

Transform things you can control. Be your own light at the end of the tunnel. Take time for yourself and breathe. Refuse to let negative people or situations get you down. Envision success and put yourself wholeheartedly into it.