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Tag: Communication


Blended Learning for Executives

Educational leadership can benefit significantly from blended learning by both formal education programs and virtual training. Bringing these two facets to key leaders can prove to be valuable in the development of building relationships, innovative thinking, and employee engagement within the organization.

The paradigm where everyone learns differently could be addressed by offering the opportunity for blended learning, as some excel from in-person institutions and others with webinars or virtual classrooms; bringing both options could provide a foundation that can be embedded in the workplace. Once critical leadership competencies are formed, these new behavioral skillsets can help bridge organizational gaps by building informal connections, fulfilling company goals, and guiding shared visions across all functions.

The combination of individually driven virtual learning and formal educational programs offers executive leadership the tools to provide a better overall workplace atmosphere.

Competitive Retention Strategies: Mortgage Division

New market, new demand!

Ask yourself, what are we doing as a company to retain our talent within our mortgage division?

The mortgage industry is in high demand of employees, as mortgage rates continue to remain under 3%. Due to the urgency of hiring candidates with mortgage operations experience, employers are seeking mortgage leaders to join their organization.  Quality talent is being swept away by other mortgage companies by virtue of monetary base compensation and incentives.

As an organization facing some of these challenges, employers are being creative on compensation structures to incentivize workers.  Incentives offered are hiring bonuses, retention tools tied to compensation, with the ability to work remotely.

If your company is facing the same challenges, reflect on your incentive strategy and retention tools needed to be competitive in a demanding mortgage rate environment.

Retention Strategies for Executive Hires!

Securing quality talent within your organization should include an internal strategic plan. Retention plans for top credit union Executives comprise of competitive salaries, targeted performance incentive goals and retention bonuses, stock options, paid time off, and ancillary allowances and benefits.

Robust, targeted performance incentive plans are successful when implemented at the offer stage/onboarding process, and even more lucrative when these plans align with industry standard. Specifically, quarterly, semi-annual, and annual performance incentives are beneficial at the Executive level and should be established to incorporate non-financial metrics and financial metrics. Non-financial metrics might include engaged members, member survey results, staff turnover ratios. Financial metrics may encompass loan growth and earnings, return on assets, capital ratio, membership growth, net income, and board evaluations (if applicable).

Once you establish the targeted goals, each metric should be broken out to a percentage of the final goal. Non-financial metrics could be 10% of the total bonus, while financial metrics are 90%, it depends on the organization’s focus to meet the needs of its employees and business strategy. Evaluating your Executive Compensation plans should be assessed annually to ensure they are in-line with the industry standard to achieve employee engagement and retention.

Chasing the Money or the Opportunity

Should you chase the money or the opportunity? Well first, ask yourself, ‘Is it the right fit?’ Organizations may pay well, but if they have a high turnover rate and don’t fulfill your career goals, it may be in your best interest to really think it through.

This is an internal dilemma that many people go through. Of course, you shouldn’t undervalue yourself monetarily should a job prospect check all your career boxes, but don’t let an opportunity slip away that could benefit your long-term career development. Success can be subjective, and how it is measured and valued differs from person to person.

Some companies do entice candidates with short-term monetary goals, which can burn out employees quickly, causing high turnover within an organization. It may not be in your best interest to weigh opportunities based on compensation alone; career advancement, skill development, and passion should be considered. Chasing short-term benefits could prove unfruitful in the long-run, and you may not want to look back and wish you would’ve done things differently.

The Offer

You’ve reached the final stage in the recruitment process, the offer – After the application and multiple interviews, you landed the job!

Generally, the incentive for candidates to move organizations or positions would allow candidates to seek opportunities that will provide a promotion, ability to be a key contributor within the organization, and an increase in pay structure.

When seeking a new opportunity, the motivation to make a change for a new role should be discussed initially, setting the expectations from the onset. Once an offer is extended and accepted, you have agreed to the terms and negotiation ends. Strive to find a balance to determine if a counteroffer is necessary or if it is about its monetary value or the position. Most often, it is the position job seekers are trying to attain.

Organizations have set wage bands for positions based on market and internal value, from minimum, mid-point, to maximum of the salary range. Various other factors could help offset any wage bands misalignments when pursuing a job offer, including sign-on bonuses, targeted variable (bonus) pay, allowances, paid time off, supplemental retirement plans, and additional benefits.

These are all part of the equation when evaluating your next opportunity!

How to approach counteroffers

Negotiating pay is a difficult situation when offered the job of your dreams. While the job description may check all of the boxes, compensation is also a major determinant in whether you should accept the position or not.

There is a certain threshold that employers will withstand when in the counteroffer stage of hiring. By doing your research and recognizing the market compensation wage bands, you will set yourself up for far better success than by countering the future of your career blindly. Trust the process as you think about negotiating an offer once it has been presented.  Seek counsel from a professional to guide and lead you through each phase of the negotiation.

When countering the offer, focus on why you want to join the organization and what is important to you at this stage of your career.   There are other benefits can be included as part of the compensation package which can include, commute time, work-hour flexibility, job responsibilities, family support, and ability to contribute in the strategic success of the company. Focus on how your dream job can transform more than just your bank account.

Countering what you feel is deserved can be effective when done properly. If conducted correctly, counteroffers can provide better benefits, incentives, job security, and ultimately pay for a job that was already a dream to begin with.

Should Succession Planning be on your Company Agenda?

As the structure of an organization matures and employees begin to mature and transition from their initial roles, succession planning becomes a key piece in ensuring the organization will continue to run smoothly.

Be proactive in outlining a succession plan that works best for the culture of the company. Set aside adequate time to identify the key traits needed for another leader to fill the soon-to-be vacant position. Even if a transition is not expected immediately, proper timing and planning make a difference in the midst of any occupational shift.

In the spirit of timing, this offers an excellent opportunity to provide training to other employees that may be interested in leadership roles down the road or perform trail runs for potential candidates whom may be closer to the level of accepting more responsibility. Opening up the chance for employees to actively seek leadership roles and identifying top performers, organizations pave a greater road towards smoother transitions.

Through training and vetting, it is important to relay the shared vision of the organization. Engaging in transparent strategic conversations will not only help develop a greater vision for future success inter-departmentally but it will also magnify the strengths of top-performers.

Once an internal succession structure is identified, the process should be mirrored and appropriately transitioned to fit the hiring strategy, establishing the traits valued in top-leadership parallels that of new additions.

How to Properly Resign as an Executive

After deciding to forge a new career path, resigning from the current position is naturally one of the next steps. As an executive, the utmost importance falls on how their departure transpires and how it affects the company in the long haul.

Appropriate transparency and confidence will define how any executive leaves their current role. Naturally, as a leader departs, followers begin to raise suspicion. Being confident in the transition without making vague excuses will alleviate that worrisome feeling that may arise in employees. The reasoning behind such change should be professional and future-centric rather than focused on the specific instances that led to the transition.

An in-person announcement to the organization is the best way to break news for any leave. Falling in line with transparency, this method allows current employees the chance to ask questions, witness organizational support and positivity and, most importantly, observe the raw emotion that is paired with any goodbye. No matter the circumstances, good or bad, executives will be able to better gauge the reaction of their team and quash any potential rumors or “this is what I heard” scenarios.

Leaving the company in good standing should be at the forefront of any executive’s mind after deciding to depart from their current role. While two weeks’ notice may be the norm, more time may be needed to ensure adequate measures and plans are in place to set the company up for future success. Whether it be two weeks or two months, a proper go-ahead plan should be established and communicated to support the company that such executive was once a part of.

The Advantages of Job Shadowing

Having the opportunity to shadow senior leadership when beginning a career or transitioning to a new position provides countless benefits, specifically, the resources and skillsets that are available in a shortened timeframe. But, why choose shadowing versus another on-boarding system when welcoming a new employee?

Shadowing is most important when the position is best learned through seeing or doing. The new hire is able to take in a plethora of information that, if trained through a different method, might be overlooked or not mentioned. It provides a “hands-on” approach to a position that may require a “hands-on” mindset.

The ability to learn firsthand from leaders who have forged their own path to success is second to none. The time spent with senior employees opens to the door to understand the ins and outs of the company culture, fine-tune and continue to develop professionally, and gain expert insights into the business. Shadowing also expedites the on-boarding process as new hires begin to acquaint themselves with the business sooner.

Job shadowing provides a behind-the-curtain look at the expectations of job duties, key deliverables needed, and the interactions between coworkers and peers and coworkers and senior management. This provides an excellent chance for senior management to recognize if processes, job descriptions or culture needs to be restructured or reevaluated.

Considerations for the Future

Making a career change can be difficult for anyone. However, the dependence of a transition for an executive weighs on the prospective employer and their future with the company.

Personal growth remains to be the most significant factor an executive considers when considering a career change. With an emphasis placed on continual learning, most executives search for opportunities that allow them to expand their skill set rather than chasing a title advancement.

And like any other searching candidate, executives also rely on the opportunities that the potential company offers. When given a chance to stretch their skills and abilities to new levels, allowing for them to see a significant change, executives are far more willing to shift to that new role than stay complacent in what they know.

Environmental factors come into account during the decision process, too. Is a shift in career going to make a positive impact on work-based culture? Will a transition allow for greater responsibility and oversight of a larger team? How will this position fall into the entirety of the organizational success? These questions all play a factor in an executive deciding whether to make a move or not. This element is mostly dependent on the overall goals of the executive candidate and the current state of their ongoing position.

While direct compensation does not play a significant role in an executive move, the financial stability of the organization does. If the prospective company shows greater return and less risk in company sales, work hours, employee turnover, mergers and acquisitions and competitive advantage compared to their current position, a top-level executive will realize those benefits and make the move into a new career.