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Tag: Employee


Competitive Retention Strategies: Mortgage Division

New market, new demand!

Ask yourself, what are we doing as a company to retain our talent within our mortgage division?

The mortgage industry is in high demand of employees, as mortgage rates continue to remain under 3%. Due to the urgency of hiring candidates with mortgage operations experience, employers are seeking mortgage leaders to join their organization.  Quality talent is being swept away by other mortgage companies by virtue of monetary base compensation and incentives.

As an organization facing some of these challenges, employers are being creative on compensation structures to incentivize workers.  Incentives offered are hiring bonuses, retention tools tied to compensation, with the ability to work remotely.

If your company is facing the same challenges, reflect on your incentive strategy and retention tools needed to be competitive in a demanding mortgage rate environment.

Retention Strategies for Executive Hires!

Securing quality talent within your organization should include an internal strategic plan. Retention plans for top credit union Executives comprise of competitive salaries, targeted performance incentive goals and retention bonuses, stock options, paid time off, and ancillary allowances and benefits.

Robust, targeted performance incentive plans are successful when implemented at the offer stage/onboarding process, and even more lucrative when these plans align with industry standard. Specifically, quarterly, semi-annual, and annual performance incentives are beneficial at the Executive level and should be established to incorporate non-financial metrics and financial metrics. Non-financial metrics might include engaged members, member survey results, staff turnover ratios. Financial metrics may encompass loan growth and earnings, return on assets, capital ratio, membership growth, net income, and board evaluations (if applicable).

Once you establish the targeted goals, each metric should be broken out to a percentage of the final goal. Non-financial metrics could be 10% of the total bonus, while financial metrics are 90%, it depends on the organization’s focus to meet the needs of its employees and business strategy. Evaluating your Executive Compensation plans should be assessed annually to ensure they are in-line with the industry standard to achieve employee engagement and retention.

Chasing the Money or the Opportunity

Should you chase the money or the opportunity? Well first, ask yourself, ‘Is it the right fit?’ Organizations may pay well, but if they have a high turnover rate and don’t fulfill your career goals, it may be in your best interest to really think it through.

This is an internal dilemma that many people go through. Of course, you shouldn’t undervalue yourself monetarily should a job prospect check all your career boxes, but don’t let an opportunity slip away that could benefit your long-term career development. Success can be subjective, and how it is measured and valued differs from person to person.

Some companies do entice candidates with short-term monetary goals, which can burn out employees quickly, causing high turnover within an organization. It may not be in your best interest to weigh opportunities based on compensation alone; career advancement, skill development, and passion should be considered. Chasing short-term benefits could prove unfruitful in the long-run, and you may not want to look back and wish you would’ve done things differently.

The Offer

You’ve reached the final stage in the recruitment process, the offer – After the application and multiple interviews, you landed the job!

Generally, the incentive for candidates to move organizations or positions would allow candidates to seek opportunities that will provide a promotion, ability to be a key contributor within the organization, and an increase in pay structure.

When seeking a new opportunity, the motivation to make a change for a new role should be discussed initially, setting the expectations from the onset. Once an offer is extended and accepted, you have agreed to the terms and negotiation ends. Strive to find a balance to determine if a counteroffer is necessary or if it is about its monetary value or the position. Most often, it is the position job seekers are trying to attain.

Organizations have set wage bands for positions based on market and internal value, from minimum, mid-point, to maximum of the salary range. Various other factors could help offset any wage bands misalignments when pursuing a job offer, including sign-on bonuses, targeted variable (bonus) pay, allowances, paid time off, supplemental retirement plans, and additional benefits.

These are all part of the equation when evaluating your next opportunity!

What’s more important – the degree or the experience?

With degrees becoming more and more common, the experience that a candidate brings to the position has taken the front seat in the hiring process. Needless to say, a degree does offer valuable skill important to a candidate’s resume.

The significance of completing a degree speaks to the candidate’s ability to be successful in various life and job-related aspects such as multi-tasking, social interactions, and ethical dilemmas. While the degree title and focus furthers the intellectual aspect of a candidate, it does not necessarily correlate to how much success a person will have within their position.

Experience is considerably the most valuable aspect a candidate can possess. The real-world experience that is transferable to the position in mind, provides far deeper insight as to how the employee will perform in a certain situation rather than the assumption of taught skills in the classroom.

However, a degree should not be any less valuable. Many entry qualifications for open positions specifically highlight the need of a degree to advance. Where the experience begins to overshadow a degree is through the interview process and the ability of a candidate to equate actual experiential moments to the demands of the job.

While the accomplishment of completing the route of higher education is still highly regarded in job recruiting, having first-hand knowledge of the qualifications that are to be expected has started to become the frontrunner when choosing between candidates with virtually similar resumes.

Employee Company Reviews – how important are they?

Employee reviews can reveal a lot about an organization. Do you know what your employee reviews say about your company?

Sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed provide direct employee feedback about companies which can either make or break the recruitment process. Scouting for talent, in most cases, has a direct connection to how a company is perceived by its employees. So, how can organizations stay on top of these reviews and use them to their advantage?

Turn the critical reviews into opportunity! It is best to dedicate the needed time to monitor your online brand and use this feedback to make a difference in the company’s culture. Knowing the honest, and sometimes, painful truth about how employees discern their time within the business can help strengthen the structure of the workplace.

The idea of transparency should not be something to shy away from either. Knowing the ins and outs of a certain position or department and the impression it holds both internally and externally, will give managers the ability to identify weaknesses, be pragmatic and fill in the gaps recognized by employees.

Turning Over a New Leaf on Employee Turnover

The connotations associated with “employee turnover” are often negative. From lost costs to disruption in an organization, employee turnover does have significant risks that test the strength of a company and its structure.

What is often overlooked is the benefit that employee turnover may bring to the organization.

Zappos, an online shoe and clothing store, has been widely praised for its mindset surrounding employee satisfaction. In 2015, the company began offering its employees exit payments, an incentive given to those who were interested in the company but decided it was not a right fit for them. This incentive lead to approximately 14% of employees accepting the offer.

While some turnover is encouraged, the importance of organizational agility is two-fold. The ability for employees to manage their employment satisfaction translates into greater success, for those who stay with the company have a mindset committed to the company’s growth and future.  Wiith the possibility of sporadic, unplanned position vacancies, positioning the business model to react and absorb any negative repercussions takes time, commitment and understanding.

It is crucial to create a culture that recognizes employee turnover is not always negative but rather something that can offer a positive shift in skills, mindsets, and motivations for the workforce, ultimately lending to the success of an agile and proactive company.

Enhancing Your LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn remains to be one of the largest professional networking sites today – giving insight into the company and employee dynamic. When searching for a new career, keeping up with your personal LinkedIn profile and building your brand is an important aspect to any job search.

Your LinkedIn profile gives a quick snapshot of your experience and should be carefully constructed to provide recruiters with the most accurate depiction of who you are as an executive.

While an easy field to complete, adding a degree or certification level to the name portion of your profile increases the chances of coming up in recruiting search results. Following your name is the headline – a highly undervalued profile segment that should answer who you are, what you do and how you can help (Forbes, 2017). Consider this to be the most important aspect of your profile as it is, besides your name, the first and possibly, the last thing a recruiter sees.

Your summary should go one step further to engage with recruiters. This portion of your profile is suggested to include a summarization of measurable goals and attention grabbing achievements. It should answer who you are and what you do on a deeper and more intimate level. This field, while engaging, should be concise and effective. Ensure that if anyone stops looking at your profile at this moment, they have a good understanding of your current passions and future goals.

Your experience should be organized in a way that highlights how you handle problem-solution situations. Having quantifiable details that address what the problem was, the steps that were taken and the results achieved will quickly showcase your experiential skill set. As always, it is important to use key words and integrate the skills that were gained in each situation. Your professional experience is a way for recruiters to see if your achievements fit well based on what the company is looking for in a candidate.

By enhancing and articulating these sections of your LinkedIn profile not only will you grab the attention of recruiters and like-minded colleagues but it allows you to continue the professional demeanor that has been established throughout your professional career.

Coaching and Development Replaces Performance Management

Twenty years ago, if you asked any employee how they were evaluated in their job, they would most likely say through employee performance ratings – a system designed to rank the performance of employees against colleagues strictly measured through output. Today, companies are turning towards a new regime of employee performance ratings – a system based on skills and attitude with the ability to drive change.

Managers who provide regular feedback and opportunities for growth and improvement are far more likely to have high-performers and greater employee satisfaction responses. The focus on coaching and development is becoming a priority in the workforce as more and more executives have found significant links to overall business success.

Now managers must dedicate time managing and communicating the importance of performance ownership with their direct reports. Coaching requires an open mindset, willing to build and progress rather than evaluate. Most importantly, managers must recognize the complete separation between performance and employee compensation.

A shift towards this progressive movement starts with senior leaders acknowledging the need to use performance management as a way to build skills. Managers need to be taught to provide valuable feedback that encourages their employees to further excel in their role.

Expanding the Sourcing Scope

Every day, it seems as if new recruitment job board websites come into the market constantly, making it harder for potential candidates to stand out and even harder for companies to acquire qualified talent. As the need for quality talent becomes more prevalent, companies must consider broadening their sourcing scope and seeking alternative solutions.

Employers must take full advantage of the resources that are available today by not overlooking cross-industry hiring. By expanding the view on the type of talent acquisition, companies will have the benefit of individuals trained in other departments, whom often, gain experience that correlates with the open position. A diverse workplace culture and sets of opinions appeals to different markets, which can help the company grow to a market outside of the initial targeted ideation.

Consider meritocracy. While the skills and experience that someone has are important to the success of the role, focusing on the ability and motivation that such employee possesses leads to greater drive for advancement in employees. This drive then positively translates into better overall company financial performance – encouraging employees to work hard for earned workplace promotions.

Rely on different sources. While employee referrals are an obvious source of talented potentials, reaching out on social platforms such as LinkedIn or industry Facebook pages may come up with surprising results. By expanding the scope that most companies have become accustomed to searching for potential hires through, the company will be able to diversify its culture and grow with a work environment that is slowly transitioning to multi-dimensional positions.