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Tag: Sourcing


Executive Hires: Are you Missing Out on Great Candidates?

Is there such thing as the perfect candidate? As an employer, during your hiring process, this is a question you should ask yourself. If you have a long list of qualifications that are required to fill this position, you could let a potential candidate slip through before you even get to the interview stage. Usually, the final candidate hired will not tick every box you once had at the beginning of the process.

Teachable candidates with the necessary technical skills, who are a culture fit should be your ideal contenders. If a candidate is lacking in an area where they can be trained and developed, they should not be overlooked. It’s hard to find quality talent especially in a competitive market, being flexible and transparent can help with attracting the candidates you want.

As an employer, you want to stand out amongst the competition, making personal connections with candidates could identify their management style and how they will fit within the company. Think outside of the box, try not to focus on the minute details of the requirements. The perfect candidate is not out there but finding the right candidate can be done!

Recruitment and CEO Selection for Credit Unions

Working cohesively with the Search Committee of the Board of Directors as a recruitment firm is crucial during the recruitment process. While the relationship between the Board of Directors and the recruitment company is an obvious factor, the bigger picture is finding the right successor.

Making a significant succession decision means a lot of details have to align – A thorough understanding and identifying the core competencies needed to prosper in the position; realization there is not the perfect candidate that will meet a whole laundry list of requirements; and objectivity about candidates a whole, not focusing entirely on who and where they are coming from – including external or internal candidates.

While recruiters can be an essential part of the process, ultimately, each member of the Board of Directors has to be content and satisfied with their decision. Pinpointing the needs of the credit union and who will lead the culmination of the internal transformation process should be the main objective of the Board.

Each credit union is unique, and their search for a new leader is not ‘one size fits all.’

 

What defines Cultural Transformation within an organization?

What defines Cultural Transformation within an organization?

Facilitating cultural transformation in the workplace is a necessary commitment to ensure employee satisfaction and inclusion. The development of changing the organization’s culture should transform the outlook, policies, behaviors, and practices. Change has to start from executive leaders to assure the rooted, existing culture shifts from the outdated practices to the newly improved values and beliefs.

To get to the root cause of the existing culture, the company should conduct a cultural assessment to evaluate what changes need to be made. The cultural review should consider internal beliefs, such as honesty and integrity, while also examining outward actions like collaboration and information sharing. This valuation should help the business understand and indicate any dysfunction at any level within the organization.

Once executive leaders pinpoint the source, they can then cultivate change and transformation by using mindful behaviors to other leaders and managers to accomplish employee engagement in all departments. For cultural transformation to be effective, every individual must want to change any negative beliefs and values within themselves to the chosen cultural shift.

Chasing the Money or the Opportunity

Should you chase the money or the opportunity? Well first, ask yourself, ‘Is it the right fit?’ Organizations may pay well, but if they have a high turnover rate and don’t fulfill your career goals, it may be in your best interest to really think it through.

This is an internal dilemma that many people go through. Of course, you shouldn’t undervalue yourself monetarily should a job prospect check all your career boxes, but don’t let an opportunity slip away that could benefit your long-term career development. Success can be subjective, and how it is measured and valued differs from person to person.

Some companies do entice candidates with short-term monetary goals, which can burn out employees quickly, causing high turnover within an organization. It may not be in your best interest to weigh opportunities based on compensation alone; career advancement, skill development, and passion should be considered. Chasing short-term benefits could prove unfruitful in the long-run, and you may not want to look back and wish you would’ve done things differently.

Should Candidates Consider Opportunities at Different Compensation Levels?

When sourcing and recruiting candidates for a specific role or position, as a recruiter, you should always set the expectations up front with your candidates from the beginning. With the unemployment rate being at its lowest in almost 50 years, with small fluctuations monthly, candidates believe they are in control of salary negotiations, not the client or company.

Although a company gives a salary range, it does not necessarily constitute the level of pay required of the institution. Important variables candidates fail to realize:

1. Company asset size varies, which has a significant impact on compensation. Larger corporations typically have different pay bands than smaller organizations.
2. Organizational charts can differ from company to company. A Senior Vice President at one company can be at the Vice President level of another.
3. Experience does not strictly apply to the number of years of experience. Experience pertains to the job scope and qualifications required of the position and whether or not the candidate meets some or all of the requirements, significantly impact the final offer.

Of course, many other variables could influence the final offer – bonuses, PTO, benefits – the list could go on.

Every position is different. It is essential to focus on finding the right opportunity and ensuring the qualifications and level of experience are presented to the hiring manager, as appropriate.

Expanding the Sourcing Scope

Every day, it seems as if new recruitment job board websites come into the market constantly, making it harder for potential candidates to stand out and even harder for companies to acquire qualified talent. As the need for quality talent becomes more prevalent, companies must consider broadening their sourcing scope and seeking alternative solutions.

Employers must take full advantage of the resources that are available today by not overlooking cross-industry hiring. By expanding the view on the type of talent acquisition, companies will have the benefit of individuals trained in other departments, whom often, gain experience that correlates with the open position. A diverse workplace culture and sets of opinions appeals to different markets, which can help the company grow to a market outside of the initial targeted ideation.

Consider meritocracy. While the skills and experience that someone has are important to the success of the role, focusing on the ability and motivation that such employee possesses leads to greater drive for advancement in employees. This drive then positively translates into better overall company financial performance – encouraging employees to work hard for earned workplace promotions.

Rely on different sources. While employee referrals are an obvious source of talented potentials, reaching out on social platforms such as LinkedIn or industry Facebook pages may come up with surprising results. By expanding the scope that most companies have become accustomed to searching for potential hires through, the company will be able to diversify its culture and grow with a work environment that is slowly transitioning to multi-dimensional positions.