WE Specialize in
Executive Recruitment
Career Transition
Creating Your Brand
Finding Your Next Role

We pride ourselves on our PEOPLE FIRST solutions.

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

Tag: Work


New Year, New Career

It’s the beginning of a new year; with all of the ambiguity going on in the world, is it a good time to make a career change?

Self-reflection has been a focal point of the past year; with the uncertainty of the job market; many are adapting and learning new skillsets. New skillsets mean new potential candidates, as more people are switching and adjusting to different industries. People are more willing to move, and geographical obstacles are seemingly non-existent when it comes to new opportunities, as virtual interviews make the transition easier.

Businesses need to be creative in attracting this new potential talent pool. From remote work to flexibility with schedules and changes to work habits – these all have made the corporate setting a thing of the past. Malleability to this new business environment is crucial to ensuring your employees are at ease; however, the virtual aspect ensures conversations are more personable with less conflict.

Depending on your circumstances, now might be the best time to reevaluate what’s vital in your career and what you want to do differently. Purposefulness might be the new mantra for the year 2021.

Managing Client and Candidate Relationships

Managing Client and Candidate Relationships

Respectable recruiters are successful in managing the two relationships – client and candidate – during the recruitment process. Both relationships are equally important, requiring trust and communication.

Technology has evolved and streamlined the recruitment process, primarily through Client Relationship Management (CRM) software and Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS). These systems are beneficial to recruiters; however, the rapport between the recruiter and their contacts gets lost in translation.

Personal connections are unequivocally the foundation for recruiters, clients, and candidates alike. Simple callbacks and touching base with clients and candidates on both sides of the recruitment process on a frequent basis is essential, making sure both your clients and candidates feel involved in the process.

Getting back to the basics is vital for successful recruiters, especially during the current climate, where we may not be getting human interaction as much as we used to. People want to feel like they aren’t just another number, and reassuring them they are as important as the next client or candidate can foster a reputable reputation.

What defines Cultural Transformation within an organization?

What defines Cultural Transformation within an organization?

Facilitating cultural transformation in the workplace is a necessary commitment to ensure employee satisfaction and inclusion. The development of changing the organization’s culture should transform the outlook, policies, behaviors, and practices. Change has to start from executive leaders to assure the rooted, existing culture shifts from the outdated practices to the newly improved values and beliefs.

To get to the root cause of the existing culture, the company should conduct a cultural assessment to evaluate what changes need to be made. The cultural review should consider internal beliefs, such as honesty and integrity, while also examining outward actions like collaboration and information sharing. This valuation should help the business understand and indicate any dysfunction at any level within the organization.

Once executive leaders pinpoint the source, they can then cultivate change and transformation by using mindful behaviors to other leaders and managers to accomplish employee engagement in all departments. For cultural transformation to be effective, every individual must want to change any negative beliefs and values within themselves to the chosen cultural shift.

Blended Learning for Executives

Educational leadership can benefit significantly from blended learning by both formal education programs and virtual training. Bringing these two facets to key leaders can prove to be valuable in the development of building relationships, innovative thinking, and employee engagement within the organization.

The paradigm where everyone learns differently could be addressed by offering the opportunity for blended learning, as some excel from in-person institutions and others with webinars or virtual classrooms; bringing both options could provide a foundation that can be embedded in the workplace. Once critical leadership competencies are formed, these new behavioral skillsets can help bridge organizational gaps by building informal connections, fulfilling company goals, and guiding shared visions across all functions.

The combination of individually driven virtual learning and formal educational programs offers executive leadership the tools to provide a better overall workplace atmosphere.

Chasing the Money or the Opportunity

Should you chase the money or the opportunity? Well first, ask yourself, ‘Is it the right fit?’ Organizations may pay well, but if they have a high turnover rate and don’t fulfill your career goals, it may be in your best interest to really think it through.

This is an internal dilemma that many people go through. Of course, you shouldn’t undervalue yourself monetarily should a job prospect check all your career boxes, but don’t let an opportunity slip away that could benefit your long-term career development. Success can be subjective, and how it is measured and valued differs from person to person.

Some companies do entice candidates with short-term monetary goals, which can burn out employees quickly, causing high turnover within an organization. It may not be in your best interest to weigh opportunities based on compensation alone; career advancement, skill development, and passion should be considered. Chasing short-term benefits could prove unfruitful in the long-run, and you may not want to look back and wish you would’ve done things differently.

Targeting End of the Year Priorities

It’s hard to believe that 2017 is already almost halfway done. Now, comes the time to take a look back and reflect on the goals set out at the beginning of the year and realign your priorities focus on your goals for the remainder of the year and finish strong!

While it may sound tedious, the number one priority for a leader approaching the second half of the year is building upon employee engagement and satisfaction. Satisfying existing employees will decrease the need for new talent acquisition. Engaged employees are happy employees, and those employees contribute positively to the overall success of the company. Defining career development initiatives and actively listening to concerns allows for employees to feel as if they can make a difference and impact on the organization.

As with every industry, new technology continues to shape the way organizations conduct business, impacting systems, processes, and people. And as much as some people may be trying to avoid the technological boom, the digital age is here to stay. It is important to keep up with technical innovation and develop strategies that advance the company to competitive heights. Innovative processes and new business models may need to be developed to support the movement. However, such implementations will lead to great success in the long run and will set you apart from other traditional companies.

None of these priorities are possible without satisfied employees that embrace the vision and strategy for the organization. Recruitment and retention should be a top priority leading into the second half of 2017. Think about establishing a formal recruitment strategy and hiring the talent of the future. This will significantly impact your organizational culture and create future success.

Coaching and Development Replaces Performance Management

Twenty years ago, if you asked any employee how they were evaluated in their job, they would most likely say through employee performance ratings – a system designed to rank the performance of employees against colleagues strictly measured through output. Today, companies are turning towards a new regime of employee performance ratings – a system based on skills and attitude with the ability to drive change.

Managers who provide regular feedback and opportunities for growth and improvement are far more likely to have high-performers and greater employee satisfaction responses. The focus on coaching and development is becoming a priority in the workforce as more and more executives have found significant links to overall business success.

Now managers must dedicate time managing and communicating the importance of performance ownership with their direct reports. Coaching requires an open mindset, willing to build and progress rather than evaluate. Most importantly, managers must recognize the complete separation between performance and employee compensation.

A shift towards this progressive movement starts with senior leaders acknowledging the need to use performance management as a way to build skills. Managers need to be taught to provide valuable feedback that encourages their employees to further excel in their role.

Compensation Budgeting

Budgeting is always a hot topic when it comes to employee benefits, which can sometimes lead to recruiters feeling as if their budget is stretched too thin to cover everything that is wanted in the workplace. But, it doesn’t need to be like that – here are some simple tricks to making the most out of a tight budget:

  • Offer competitive non-salary benefits. Make up for a lack of monetary incentives with benefits catered towards the employee’s needs. Offering childcare support, flexible schedules, office space, remote working opportunities and other chances for employees to feel valued is a great alternative that does not require salary-impacted benefits – rather, focus on employee work-life balance.
  • Focus on what’s important. There are items that can be considered “must-haves” that will make a huge difference in the day-to-day work life. Prioritizing items that are “must-haves” versus the “nice-to-haves.” Do this by ensuring the expenses are worth every penny.
  • Forecast – it’s vital to a healthy workplace budget. Keep in mind that staffing will change in the next year whether you see it coming or not. It is important to plan for these changes and leave a bit of budgetary room available to account for those changes, especially considering employee compensation.
  • Understand that you will not always be right. Whatever compensation package is offered, it is never going to be the best thing for every employee, and that is okay. Realize the biggest factors that will lead to company and employee success. One of the best ways to show appreciation for employees is fair compensation, so focus your attention on the benefits that will make the biggest impact for the largest number of employees.

 

Communicating expectations in an interview

Many times, to attain top candidates, job expectations and job realities do not always coincide. Significant responsibility is placed on the company to set realistic expectations from day one, so the possibility of a future dissatisfied employee is lessened.

Setting job responsibilities needs to be the priority. While responsibilities may vary, providing a framework of what to expect from day to day will give the candidate a better understanding of what they will be doing. This is an excellent opportunity for management to identify specific job duties to decrease the possibility of task overlap, making for a better operating workplace.

With the changing work place culture, in many cases, the expectations for business hours vary from position to position. However, it is important to alleviate the frustrations of either working too much or too little than what is expected by outlining specific office hour expectations. Finding an employee who is unwilling to work more than 40 hours may be detrimental to the success of them in that position; it is better to outline those expectations sooner than later.

An expectation for company culture should be drawn out before making a hire as well. If extracurricular office activities are a large part of the social side of the business, the candidate should know that they may be asked to participate in them. The social aspect of a company plays a significant role in employee satisfaction, and it would be advantageous to promote culture the right away to understand if the candidate will be a good fit.

 

Appealing to Passive Candidates

Active versus passive candidates seem to be a constant topic of discussion. Whether the applicant is actively pursuing a position or has passively encountered the organization, it is important to maintain an active line of external communication to display the culture of the company and cultivate a high level of interest with the candidate.

According to a 2017 examination, 89% of people within the workforce are either somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs. However, in December of 2016, a survey by CareerBuilder.com reported that “more than one in five workers (22 percent) are planning to change jobs in 2017.”

These “planners,” or passive candidates, are considered to be desirable because they are content with where they are. There is less competition when speaking with these candidates because they are not actively searching and the candidates are more inclined to speak truthfully since there is no pressure of a job. So, how can you position yourself to appeal to active job seekers but still engage with the passive candidates?

Keep up with social media! This is an ever-changing but entirely influential area of business that needs to be at the top of the list when it comes to finding the right candidate. A great post can instantly be shared by others and can reach a large amount of people. Social media fosters a way to build relationships and communicate in an informal way that is reflective of the culture that the company will bring.

Create a talent pipeline. Develop and maintain a list of potential candidates who may, either today or in the future, be in search of a position within the company to allow a pipeline of passive candidates in the event a position becomes available, it is easy to reach out and sell the opportunity that would position them for advancement.

Companies must always encourage employee referrals. This should be a primary source for candidate searches since most active or semi-active job seekers reach out to their friends first to seek job leads. This recruitment method allows employees to actively speak on behalf of the company, creating the opportunity for great and reliable candidate engagement.

Consider the candidate’s experience. Design an employee application and interview process that works with all types of candidates. It is important to continue the efficiency of the interview process in order to secure the best candidate for the job.